30 Flowers to Start From Seed in April

Are you thinking of growing some flowers from seed in the month of April? There are many different flowers to choose from as spring begins to arrive for many hardiness zones. In this article, gardening expert Kelli Klein shares some of her favorite flowers to plant in the month of April!

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April is the time of the year when many growers are itching to get plants out into the garden. Depending on your area, this may be easier said than done!

Regardless of whether or not you have snow in the 10-day forecast, plenty of flowers can be started from seed in April, but your USDA hardiness zone will determine whether or not you need to start them indoors and then transplant them out or if you can direct sow (always refer to the seed packet for specific instructions).

There are flowers on this list for all types of gardeners and growing conditions, including annuals, perennials, flowers for full sun locations, and even flowers that tolerate shade.

One thing is for sure, the benefits of adding flowers to your landscape are endless. They’re not only beautiful to look at, but they attract beneficial insects, which can increase the health of your garden overall. Some make beautiful cut flowers for your table, and some are even edible!

Before we get started, you can find most of the seeds mentioned in this article at Botanical Interests, which is an organic seed company owned by Epic Gardening. Botanical Interests carries a massive selection of organic seeds, from vegetables to flowers.

Marigolds

Close-up of blooming marigolds in a sunny garden. The medium-sized flowers have a two-layer row of petals in shades of yellow, orange and red, and a prominent central disc. The leaves are dark green, pinnately divided, and slightly hairy.
Marigolds are easy to grow, come in various colors and types, and function as a natural pest deterrent.
Botanical NameTagetes erecta
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and SpreadMarigold varieties range in sizes from 6 inches up to 3 feet tall!
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual

Marigold flowers are generally orange, red-orange, or yellow. They are easy to grow, making them a great choice for beginner gardeners! The most common marigold types are French, Signet, and African. Certain marigolds reach a height of 6 inches tall which makes them perfect for borders, while other varieties can grow up to 4 feet tall!

Marigolds have properties that can deter pests, and for this reason, they are a great companion plant in the vegetable garden. They flower profusely, and deadheading the spent flowers will encourage more blooms.

They make a beautiful cut flower, and they’re edible too. Bees love them, and they will bloom from late summer into the fall right up until the first frost, which provides forage for pollinators when not much else is still around.

You can leave the last round of flowers on the plant to dry and collect the seeds for next year. Cover seeds with ¼ inch of soil and keep evenly moist until germination.

Borage

Close-up of a flowering plant Borago officinalis against a blurred background in a sunny garden. The plant, commonly known as borage, has blue, star-shaped flowers that bloom in clusters on hairy stems.
Borage, also known as bee bush or bee bread, easily attracts pollinators with its blue star-shaped flowers.
Botanical NameBorago officinalis
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade will bloom more in full sun
Height and Spread3 feet tall and 2 feet wide
Hardiness Zone3-10
Annual or PerennialAnnual, but readily self-seeds and comes back year after year

Borage is known for its ability to attract pollinators, specifically bumblebees and small native bees – so much so that it is also known as bee bush or bee bread. It is easily identifiable with its blue star-shaped flowers and greenish-gray spiky stems. This herb is a wonderful addition to any garden due to its many uses.

The leaves can be brewed to make tea, and the tiny blue flowers taste like cucumber and make a beautiful garnish for cold soups and salads or even frozen into ice cubes for a fancy cocktail.

It self-seeds so readily that if you plant it once, you’re sure to have it in your garden year after year. Poke seeds into the soil ¼ inch to ½ inch deep.

Cosmos

Close-up of a flowering Cosmos plant in a sunny garden. The plant produces daisy-like flowers in shades of white and pink with small disc-shaped yellow centers.
Cosmos come in various colors and attract bees, butterflies, and birds when they go to seed.
Botanical NameCosmos
Sun RequirementsFull sun can benefit from partial shade in areas with extreme heat
Height and SpreadCosmos varieties range in sizes from 1-6 feet tall and 1-3 feet wide.
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual

These daisy-like flowers come in a wide range of colors. They attract bees, butterflies, and even birds when they go to seed. The flowers sit atop long slender stems that sway in the breeze. They are low-maintenance, easy to grow, and will even tolerate poor soil conditions.

These flowers are native to Mexico and will tolerate hot and dry growing conditions. Seeds are easily collected at the end of the growing season for the following year. Sow seeds lightly and cover with ¼ of fine soil.

Nasturtium

Close-up of a flowering Tropaeolum plant in a sunny garden near a wire fence. The plant has bright orange-red and yellow tubular flowers with round, water lily-like green leaves. The flowers have a characteristic spur extending from the back, and the leaves are round with serrated edges.
Nasturtium is an edible flower that functions as a trap crop for aphids.
Botanical NameTropaeolum
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread12-18 inches tall and 12-78 inches wide depending on the type. Some trailing-type nasturtiums can really sprawl!
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual in zones 2-8, perennial in zones 9-11

Another dual-purpose flower that is both beautiful and edible! Nasturtium means “nose twister” in Latin, which refers to the facial expression after tasting the flowers. They can be quite peppery and were even used as a pepper substitute in World War II.

They’re also a good source of vitamin C and iron, and they can be used in your garden as a trap crop. They are a favorite of aphids, so you can use them to lure the bugs away from your other crops.

Nasturtium seeds benefit from soaking overnight prior to planting to aid in germination since they have a thick seed coat. You could also nick the seed with nail clippers to help water penetrate. Sow seeds 1 inch deep since darkness is required for germination.

Zinnia

Close-up of flowering zinnias in the garden, surrounded by dark green foliage. The plant has flowers similar to daisies, with a central disk surrounded by a ring of bright pink ray petals. Zinnias have lanceolate, dark green leaves.
Zinnias are beautiful cut flowers that bloom profusely and are loved by pollinators.
Botanical NameZinnia
Sun RequirementsDwarf varieties grow to 6-12 inches tall and wide, while other varieties can grow up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide
Height and SpreadDwarf varieties grow to 6-12 inches tall and wide while other varieties can grow up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide
Hardiness Zone3-10
Annual or PerennialAnnual

Zinnias come in a variety of colors and make a beautiful cut flower. Cutting them back will encourage them to bloom even more! They flower profusely throughout the growing season and hold up well in a vase. They make great dried flowers for crafts and wreaths as well.

The bees, butterflies, and birds love them just as much as we do! And we definitely love them; they were even the state flower of Indiana from 1931 to 1957. Sow seeds ¼ inch deep.

Zinnia seeds prefer warm soil, so they do well starting indoors on a heat mat and then transplanted after the last frost. If you are looking for a fall-blooming cut flower, Zinnias are one of the best choices you can make.

Chocolate Flower

Close-up of a Berlandiera lyrata flower in a sunny garden. The flower is small, daisy-like, with elongated oval yellow petals and brownish-purple center.
Lyreleaf Greeneyes is a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance yellow daisy that smells like chocolate.
Botanical NameBerlandiera lyrata
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread12-15 inches tall and 18-24 inches wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

Also known as Lyreleaf Greeneyes because of the shape of the leaves and green center that reveals itself after the flower dies back. But it is more often referred to as Chocolate Flower or Chocolate Daisy because the flowers actually smell like chocolate!

This beautiful yellow daisy is a perennial that will drop seeds and continue to spread over the years (if you let it). It is drought tolerant and low maintenance which makes it a great choice for xeriscaping and water-wise gardens.

Lightly cover seeds with soil and keep them moist until germination.

Columbine

Close-up of blooming Aquilegia in the garden. The plant has delicate bell-shaped flowers with five white petals, purple sepals and spurs bent back. The foliage consists of fern-like leaves that are bluish-green in color and form a basal rosette at the bottom of the plant.
Columbines are short-lived perennials that self-seed and have a long taproot.
Botanical NameAquilegia
Sun RequirementsFull sun, or dappled shade in areas with hot summers
Height and Spread1-3 feet tall and 18 inches wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

Columbines belong to the buttercup family, and the name Columbine comes from Columba, which means dove. Columbine is the state flower of Colorado, and the deep blue Columbines that are found growing in the Rocky Mountain region are direct descendants of the earliest Columbines.

Columbines are short-lived perennials that last 2-3 years but will self-seed, and new plants will appear each year to replace them. These flowers have a long taproot and can be difficult to transplant, so it’s best to direct sow. Cover lightly with ¼ inch of soil.

Hollyhock

Close-up of a blooming Alcea rosea covered in water drops, against a blurred green background. The plant produces tall spiers of large, showy flowers in a pale pink hue. The flowers are collected in a tall spike and have a prominent yellow center. The leaves are large, heart-shaped, with a rough and fluffy texture.
Hollyhocks produce large hibiscus-like blooms and are perennial, but each plant only lasts a few years.
Botanical NameAlcea rosea
Sun RequirementsDoes well in both full sun and partial shade
Height and Spread3-8 feet tall and 1-3 feet wide
Hardiness Zone3-8
Annual/PerennialPerennial

Hollyhocks produce large blooms that resemble hibiscus and that’s because they’re in the same family. They are both a part of the Mallow family.

Hollyhocks are perennial and will self-seed, resulting in a patch of flowers wherever you choose to plant them. They are perennial, but each plant generally only lasts a few years.

The flowers bloom along a stem that grows upright and can reach heights of up to 8 feet! They come in a variety of colors that range from pink to black! Press seeds firmly into the soil’s surface and keep them moist to aid in germination.

Poppies

Close-up of blooming Papaver in a sunny garden. The flowers are large and showy, with four to six red petals, with a prominent central disc of dark purple stamens. The leaves are finely dissected, bright green.
Poppies have a history of medicinal use, but nowadays, they are mostly grown for their beautiful flowers.
Botanical NamePapaver
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread6-12 inches tall and 4-36 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-11
Annual or PerennialAnnuals in zones 4-8, short-lived perennial in zones 9-11

You may remember from a popular sitcom episode that poppy seeds can produce a false positive on a drug test. This isn’t just a TV trope! Morphine is created from the milky latex in the seed head of the opium poppy.

King Tut, who has entombed in 1325 BC, was dressed in ceremonial clothing made partly from poppy plants. There were even illustrations of poppies on his jewelry and furniture.

Nowadays, poppies are mostly grown for their beautiful flowers that attract bees and butterflies. But yes, these will produce the same poppy seeds on your breakfast bagel. You can collect them and eat them or save them for planting the following year. Cover seeds with ⅛ inch of soil and keep evenly moist.

Fun fact: in California, poppies grow wild and are the state flower!

Primrose

Close-up of a blooming Primula vulgaris in a garden against a blurred background. The plant has bright yellow five-petalled flowers that grow in clusters on short stems. The flowers have a central yellow eye and are surrounded by a rosette of oval wrinkled leaves with serrated edges. The leaves are dark green and slightly hairy.
Primroses bloom early in the spring and are one of the first food sources for butterflies.
Botanical NamePrimula vulgaris
Sun RequirementsPartial shade
Height and Spread6-20 inches tall and 8-20 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-8
Annual/PerennialPerennial

The name primrose comes from the Latin word “primula,” which means first. This is because they bloom in early spring and are one of the first food sources for butterflies. Because of their tolerance to cold climates, the seeds can be sown anytime between January and April.

The evening primrose flowers open up at night, providing an important food source for nighttime pollinators like hawk moths.

This perennial will come back every year, and because of its sprawling growth habit, it makes an excellent ground cover. Surface sow seeds and cover them with a layer of vermiculite.

Verbena

Close-up of blooming Verbena Officinalis in a garden against a blurred background. The plant has small pale purple flowers collected in rounded inflorescences.
Verbena’s umbel flowers attract parasitic wasps, making it a beneficial companion plant for the vegetable garden.
Botanical NameVerbena Officinalis
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread1 foot tall and 2-5 feet wide
Hardiness Zone4-8
Annual or PerennialPerennial

The umbel flowers of Verbena make them a favorite of parasitic wasps. These beneficial bugs can damage pests like tomato hornworms, making verbena a great companion plant for the vegetable garden.

The foliage can also be used as an herb, and lemon verbena is particularly prized for its citrus flavor. Sow seeds indoors in seed starting soil  ⅛ inch deep and provide a heat mat to help speed germination.

Yarrow

Close-up of blooming Achillea millefolium in a sunny garden. The plant has tall stems with flat terminal inflorescences of tiny pink and white flowers. The leaves are fern-like, dark green.
Yarrow is a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant perennial that attracts beneficial insects.
Botanical NameAchillea millefolium
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread6-24 inches tall and 2-3 feet wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

Another umbel flower is yarrow, which comes in a variety of colors. The most popular and widely available are pink, white, and yellow. This perennial is very low-maintenance, drought tolerant, and will attract a wide range of beneficial insects to your garden.

Yarrow can grow either short or tall depending on the amount of water it receives. It will grow quite tall in years with a lot of spring rain; in drier years, it will remain on the shorter side. Seeds can be started indoors for more reliable germination. They can take up to 45 days to germinate!

Calendula

Close-up of blooming Calendula officinalis in a sunny garden. The plant has bright orange flowers with dark green, lanceolate leaves that are slightly hairy and serrated.
Calendula flowers are edible and can be used for tea or dye.
Botanical NameCalendula officinalis
Sun RequirementsFull sun to part shade
Height and Spread15 inches tall and 12 inches wide
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual in zones 2-8, perennial in zones 9-11

Calendula flowers are edible and can be left to steep in a jar of water or placed in the sun for a delicious sun tea. They are also often dried and used as a natural dye.

They are in the daisy family, closely related to marigolds, and have many of the same properties. Sow seeds and cover with ½ inch of soil. Plants will flower 6-8 weeks after germination.

Echinacea

Close-up of blooming Echinacea angustifolia on a blurred green background. The plant has large purple-pink daisy-like flowers with spiky copper-colored central buds. The leaves are thin, lanceolate.
Echinacea is a native North American herb and a common ingredient in tea.
Botanical NameEchinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and Spread12-24 inches tall and 10-18 inches wide
Hardiness Zone3-8
Annual or PerennialPerennial

Also referred to as coneflower, Echinacea, this perennial herb is native to Midwest North America. The Echinacea plant is often the same Echinacea you see on grocery store shelves sold as a dried tea – three different species are used that way!

The flowers are generally pink or purple with a brown or black cone in the center which will eventually produce the seeds.

Echinacea seeds are generally sown in the late fall since they require a period of cold stratification, which they get from being outside over winter. However, you can also place seeds in the refrigerator for about a month before planting and then plant them directly into the ground in the spring. Sow seeds ¼ inch deep and keep moist until germination.

Chamomile

Top view, close-up of blooming flowers of Matricaria chamomilla in a sunny garden. Daisies have tiny, daisy-like flowers, with white oval petals and yellow centers. The leaves are pinnate and fern-like.
Chamomile is a tea herb that reduces anxiety, promotes sleep, and helps with upset stomachs.
Botanical NameMatricaria chamomilla
Sun RequirementsFull sun, but benefits from afternoon shade in hot southern climates
Height and Spread3-6 feet tall and 12 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-9
Annual or PerennialAnnual

Chamomile is another flower that is also treated as an herb and dried for use in herbal tea blends. It is known to reduce anxiety and promote sleepiness. It can also help relieve an upset stomach. These flowers are also in the daisy family and resemble small white daisies.

Chamomile seeds are very tiny and require surface sowing to germinate properly. For this reason, it’s easiest to sow them indoors, where you can provide the ideal conditions and keep the seeds evenly moist, then transplant them out after the last frost date has passed.

Dill

Close-up of Anethum graveolens in bloom against a blurred green background. Anethum graveolens, commonly known as dill, has pinnate green leaves and small yellow flowers that grow in umbels.
Dill’s yellow flowers attract beneficial insects and black swallowtail butterflies.
Botanical NameAnethum graveolens
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and SpreadThere are many different varieties ranging in size from 8-48 inches tall and 4-24 inches wide. Choose Mammoth dill for the tallest plants!
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual

While dill is mostly grown for its flavorful foliage, it also produces beautiful yellow umbel flowers that attract beneficial insects into your garden. Parasitic wasps love these flowers; while in your yard, they might even feast on a pest or two. Dill is also the host plant for black swallowtail butterflies.

If you see butterflies hovering around your dill, keep your eyes peeled for tiny eggs that turn into caterpillars who will happily chomp on your dill. Allowing your dill to flower is a great way to attract these good bugs and support the next generation of butterflies!

When you allow your dill to flower, you can collect the seeds at the end of the season. Dill also readily self-seeds, so if you plant it once, you’re sure to find it popping up all over your garden for years to come. Sow seeds indoors ¼ inch deep 6 weeks before your average last frost.

Chinese Forget-Me-Not

Close-up of a flowering Cynoglossum amabile against a blurred green background. The plant has small blue flowers with yellow centers, collected in inflorescences at the top of the stem. The leaves are lanceolate and alternate along the stem.
Chinese Forget-Me-Not prefers cooler weather and can be started in early April.
Botanical NameCynoglossum amabile
Sun RequirementsFull sun to part shade
Height and Spread12-24 inches tall and 10-12 inches wide
Hardiness Zone5-9
Annual or PerennialAnnual in Zone 5-8, perennial in Zone 9

Chinese Forget-Me-Not typically prefers the cooler weather in spring and early summer, so it’s best to start these seeds in early April. They will grow through the heat of the summer, but the flowering may slow down.

Providing them with a bit of shade in warmer climates can help with this. They will continue to flower throughout the season with deadheading. The small blue flowers are commonly used as a filler in flower arrangements. Sow seeds ¼ inch deep and keep evenly moist until germination.

Balsam Tom Thumb

Close-up of blooming Impatiens balsamina in a sunny garden. The plant has green lanceolate leaves with scalloped edges and showy, brightly colored flowers with five petals of vibrant pink-red.
Balsam Tom Thumb is a dwarf mix that can grow in full shade or part sun.
Botanical NameImpatiens balsamina
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and Spread12-16 inches tall and wide
Hardiness Zone2-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual

Balsam Tom Thumb is a wonderful dwarf mix that can grow in full shade! This makes it perfect for shady spots beneath a tree. It can also grow in full sun or part sun.

It reseeds readily and can help fill in a wildflower garden. The flowers in this mix are purple, red, white, and pink. These seeds do best when started indoors, 6-8 weeks before the last frost date, and transplanted outside after the last frost.

Candytuft

Close-up of a blooming Iberis sempervirens in a sunny garden. This evergreen plant has glossy dark green leaves and clusters of small white flowers.
This fast-growing flower is easy to grow and drought-resistant.
Botanical NameIberis sempervirens
Sun RequirementsFull sun to part shade
Height and Spread6-8 inches tall and 12-35 inches wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

This flower is commonly added to wildflower mixes and is generally easy to grow. Scatter seeds across the soil in early April, cover lightly with ¼ inch of soil, and keep evenly moist until germination.

This plant is fast-growing and will flower within a few months. It is drought resistant and loves well-draining soil, making it a good choice for rock gardens. The small flowers are usually white, pink, or purple.

Baby Blue Eyes

Close-up of Nemophila menziesii blooming in the garden. The plant has delicate blue flowers with five rounded petals and a distinctive white center. The leaves are lobed, light green, with a fuzzy texture.
California native wildflowers with a small size and sky-blue flowers that thrive in arid conditions.
Botanical NameNemophila menziesii
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread3-6 inches tall and 6 inches to 1 foot tall
Hardiness Zone7-10
Annual or PerennialAnnual

This California native wildflower does well in arid locations. It stays on the small side and produces sky-blue flowers with a white center. While most prevalent in Northern California, you can find these in various points throughout the state.

When left to self-seed and spread, these flowers can come up and bloom as early as February in their native habitat (depending on the weather), but it’s not too late to get some started in April, especially if you live in a cooler zone. Press seeds lightly into the soil since light aids in their germination.

English Wallflower

Close-up of a blooming Cheiranthus cheiri in the garden. Cheiranthus cheiri is a herbaceous perennial with narrow, lanceolate greyish green leaves growing in a rosette at the base of the plant. The flowers are bright, with four petals forming a characteristic cruciform shape. Petals red-orange. The flowers grow in dense inflorescences on top of tall thin stems.
Wallflowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds with their fragrant, nectar-producing flowers.
Botanical NameCheiranthus cheiri
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and Spread1-3 feet tall and 2-4 feet wide
Hardiness Zone5-11
Annual or PerennialAnnual in zones 5-7, or perennial in zones 8-11

Depending on your location, wallflowers can be grown as either an annual or a perennial. These nectar-producing wallflowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds. This popular ornamental plant produces fragrant flowers in the spring and into summer.

They do well in beds with tulips and forget-me-nots. Some varieties are biennial, so they won’t flower until the second year. Surface sow these seeds since they need light to aid germination.

Baby’s Breath

Close-up of a flowering Gypsophila against a blurred green background. The plant has small, delicate white double flowers that grow in clusters on tall, thin, pale green stems.
Baby’s Breath is a filler flower in bouquets containing saponins used in soaps and shampoos.
Botanical NameGypsophila
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread2-3 feet tall and wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

These tiny white delicate flowers are probably most recognizable as filler for flower bouquets. However, they got the name Baby’s Breath after becoming a popular baby shower gift.

Baby’s breath contains saponins, an organic chemical that creates a foaming reaction when agitated with water. For this reason, saponins are commonly used in soaps and shampoos.

You might want to leave these for the bees since these flowers can add height and interest to your pollinator garden. Sow seeds and lightly cover with ¼ inch of soil, firm gently.

Johnny Jump Up

Close-up of flowering Johnny Jump Up plants in the garden. The plant produces small delicate flowers with three petals in shades of purple, yellow and white. The flowers have characteristic dark lines on the petals leading to a yellow center. The plant has heart-shaped, serrated leaves with a slightly hairy texture.
Johnny jump-ups have a mild wintergreen flavor and are a short-lived perennial.
Botanical NameViola tricolor
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread6-8 inches tall and wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialBiennial or short-lived perennial

Johnny jump-ups, sometimes called wild pansies, are edible and said to have a mild wintergreen flavor. This short-lived perennial will readily self-sow and come up in clumps year after year. They prefer mild temperatures, making April the perfect time to get them started!

Sow seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before your last frost date and transplant out after all threat of frost has passed.

Prairie Coneflower

Close-up of a flowering Ratibida plant, also known as prairie coneflower or Mexican hat, against a blurred green background. The flower is small, has hanging oval petals that surround a protruding central cone. Red petals with yellow edges and base. Green-purple cone.
Prairie coneflower is a fast-growing, drought-tolerant flower that attracts bees, butterflies, and birds.
Botanical NameRatibida
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread15-24 inches tall and 18 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-8
Annual or PerennialPerennial

Prairie coneflower, sometimes called Mexican Hat, is drought-tolerant and fast-growing. Bees and butterflies love the flowers, and birds will feast on the seeds later in the season. The birds will, in turn, spread the seeds, which will result in more prairie coneflowers.

Just like with Echinacea, these flowers benefit from a period of cold stratification to increase germination rates. This can be achieved by either sowing seeds in the fall and allowing them to overwinter or placing the seeds in the refrigerator for a month before sowing in the spring.

Blue Flax

Close-up of a blooming Linum lewisii in a sunny garden. Blue Flax produces soft blue flowers with five petals and prominent yellow stamens. The leaves are thin and narrow, arranged alternately on the stem. The leaves are light green and have a slightly waxy texture.
Blue Flax produces blue flowers with edible seeds, fibers that can be used for fabric.
Botanical NameLinum lewisii
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and Spread18-30 inches tall and wide
Hardiness Zone3-8
Annual or PerennialShort-lived perennial

You’ve likely seen flax seeds for sale in the health food aisle of your local grocery store, but did you ever wonder where they came from? Well, flax seeds come from Linum lewisii, or Blue Flax, which produces beautiful blue flowers that bloom from spring into early summer. The flowers will die back and produce dried seed pods.

This short-lived perennial will last a few years, but the pods can be broken open to aid in spreading the seeds if you want even more flax flowers! The seeds have been used for food, supplements, and oil.

The fibers of this plant can be used to make fabric and cloth, and the blue flowers can even be used to make blue dye. Seeds can be started indoors 6 weeks before your last frost. Be sure to sow them on the surface of the soil, as they need light in order to germinate. 

Alyssum

Close-up of a blooming Alyssum in a sunny garden. The plant has loose inflorescences of many tiny white tubular flowers with yellow centers.
Alyssum attracts beneficial insects, is easy to grow, and is a good companion plant for vegetables.
Botanical NameAlyssum
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread4-8 inches tall and 24-36 inches wide
Hardiness Zone5-9
Annual or PerennialAnnual

Alyssum, also known as sweet alyssum, produces small white flowers that attract many beneficial insects to the garden. This annual grows as a small, bushy, compact plant that is easy to tuck into vegetable garden beds as a companion plant.

These are especially great alongside plants that grow vertically, like indeterminate tomatoes or vining crops grown on a trellis. Alyssum grows quickly and may stop blooming in extreme heat. Sprinkle lightly over the soil, as these seeds require light to germinate.

Black Eyed Susan

Close-up of Rudbeckia hirta in bloom surrounded by dark green lanceolate foliage. The flowers are large, daisy-like, flat, with black button-like centers and long narrow bright yellow petals.
Black Eyed Susans are yellow daisy-like perennials that can also self-seed and spread.
Botanical NameRudbeckia hirta
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread2-3 feet tall and wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialPerennial

These daisy-like flowers have yellow petals and black centers. As a perennial, they will come back every year, but they can also self-seed and spread if the spent blooms are not religiously deadheaded.

Black Eyed Susans are considered pioneer plants, meaning they’re usually among the first plants to grow in areas damaged by fire or other natural disasters. It is also the host plant of the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly caterpillar. Sow seeds directly 2-4 weeks before your average last frost date.

Pansy

Close-up of many flowering plants Viola tricolor var. hortensis in the garden. The plant has heart-shaped leaves with serrated edges growing in a rosette close to the ground. The flowers are large, flat, with five rounded petals arranged symmetrically. They have two-tone petals of dark purple and bright yellow, and also have dark spots radiating from the center.
Pansies are hybrids of wild pansies with bigger flowers that are hardy, edible, and self-seeding.
Botanical NameViola tricolor var. hortensis
Sun RequirementsFull direct morning sun with afternoon shade
Height and Spread6-9 inches tall and 9-12 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-10
Annual or PerennialAnnual in zones 4-6, perennial in zones 7-10

Garden pansies are hybrids of wild pansies (Johnny Jump Ups) and other flowers in the Melanium species. They look similar to Johnny Jump Ups, only with bigger flowers. They are also edible and will self-seed.

Pansies are some of the first plants to appear in nurseries since they are generally hardy in cooler conditions. For this reason, the seeds can be sown in early April while cooler weather still hangs around. Surface sow seeds and keep them evenly moist until germinated.

Virginia Stock

Close-up of blooming Malcolmia maritima in a sunny garden. Malcolmia maritima has delicate and tiny pink flowers that resemble arugula flowers. The leaves are small and narrow dark green.
Virginia Stock is a fragrant, profusely flowering annual that produces delicate white, purple, or pink flowers.
Botanical NameMalcolmia maritima
Sun RequirementsFull sun to partial shade
Height and Spread6-12 inches tall and 6 inches wide
Hardiness Zone3-9
Annual or PerennialAnnual in most climates, but can be perennial in warmer climates. Heavily reseeds itself year after year.

Virginia Stock is a part of the Brassicaceae family, which includes mustards and cabbages. The delicate white flowers resemble arugula blossoms. They are fragrant, easy to grow, and quick to bloom.

The flowers are edible, and the young green seed pods have a radish-like flavor. This profusely flowering annual can have white, purple, or pink flowers. Surface sow and barely cover these seeds with fine soil.

Shasta Daisy

Close-up of blooming Shasta Daisy flowers in a sunny garden. The flowers are large, have disc-shaped flowers with round yellow centers and white elongated petals.
Shasta daisies have white petals and yellow centers and make great cut flowers, growing well in rock gardens.
Botanical NameLeucanthemum x superbum
Sun RequirementsFull sun
Height and Spread2-3 feet tall and 18 inches wide
Hardiness Zone4-9
Annual/PerennialPerennial

Shasta daisies have a classic daisy appearance with white petals and yellow centers. They make an excellent cut flower. They require well-draining soil and do well in rock gardens.

This perennial will return every year, but unlike other daisies does not overtake the garden. Shasta daisy seeds need light to germinate, so sow lightly at the soil’s surface and keep evenly moist until germination.

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types of lilies

Flowers

74 Different Types of Beautiful Lily Varieties

LIlies are one of the most popular flowers that gardeners plant each season. They are quite stunning, and there are many different varieties that you can plant in your flower garden! In this article, we take a look at some of our favorite types of lilies, with names and pictures of each!

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Marigolds growing in pots on the ground in garden.

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