27 Native Plants That Attract Hummingbirds

Do you love watching hummingbirds flitting from flower to flower, or have you always wondered how you can attract these beautiful birds to your landscape? If you live in a location with hummingbirds, you can easily create an environment to entice these little birds to visit your yard. In this article, gardening enthusiast and wildlife biologist Liessa Bowen will share 27 favorite native plants to attract hummingbirds.

native plants for hummingbirds

Contents

Hummingbirds are tiny, acrobatic birds with dazzlingly colorful plumage. At least a dozen species frequent U.S. gardens, but fortunately, you don’t need a fancy bird feeder to attract them. By planting native plants for hummingbirds and offering them water and shelter, you can create a safe haven for these fluttering beauties.

Here, we will introduce 27 beautiful nectar-producing native flowers for hummingbirds, plus some tips for welcoming these birds to your landscape.

Quick Tips for a Hummingbird-Friendly Garden

Hummingbirds can eat several tiny insects but are best known for feeding on calorie-rich flower nectar. Native plants provide an ideal source of nectar for hummingbirds. Research shows that they are especially attracted to red tubular and trumpet-shaped flowers, although they also feed on flowers of various colors and shapes.

If you want to provide a safe-haven environment for hummingbirds, remember to:

  • Keep your cats inside
  • Grow native nectar-rich flowering plants
  • Include plants that bloom from spring through fall
  • Don’t use pesticides
  • Provide nearby trees, shrubs, or bare branches for perching
  • Spread out your flower garden to avoid territorial fights between birds
  • Provide water – an occasional misting, sprinkler, or special hummingbird bath
  • If using a hummingbird feeder, keep it clean and fresh

These 27 native plant species are sure to lure in these fascinating birds.

Anise Hyssop

Garden bed with blooming Agastache foeniculum plants in a sunny garden. Agastache foeniculum, commonly known as Anise Hyssop, is a herbaceous perennial plant. It has grey-green, lanceolate leaves that give off a pleasant anise or licorice scent when crushed. The plant produces tall spikes of tubular flowers in shades of purple, lavender or blue that are very attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. The flowers are densely arranged along the spikelets, creating a spectacular and striking appearance.
Anise hyssop is a fragrant plant with long-lasting purple flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
BOTANICAL NAME Agastache foeniculum
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Anise hyssop, or blue giant hyssop, is native to the northern United States and Canada. Anise hyssop is a member of the mint family and has fragrant leaves, making it resistant to browsing deer. This plant has a long flowering period, blooming throughout the summer and into early fall. The flowers are fragrant and attract butterflies and hummingbirds. The flower heads are showy spikes of densely-packed, small, pale purple blossoms.

Anise hyssop grows well from seed and will self-seed in ideal conditions. Plants will also be spread by rhizomes, and larger clusters can be easily divided. Grow anise hyssop in full sun with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Provide good air circulation to minimize powdery mildew and avoid wet soils, which can lead to root rot.

Bearberry

A close-up view of a branch of the Arctostaphylos uva-ursi shrub in the garden. on a blurred background. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, commonly known as Bearberry or Kinnikinnick, is a low-growing evergreen shrub. It features small, leathery leaves that are dark green and shiny on the upper surface, while the lower surface is lighter and covered in fine hairs. The bush has small reddish-green rounded berries.
Bearberry, or kinnikinnick, is a low-growing shrub native to North America, thriving in cool climates with rocky soil.
BOTANICAL NAME Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
PLANT TYPE Evergreen shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 0.5 to 1 foot
HARDINESS ZONES 2 to 6

Bearberry, sometimes called kinnikinnick, is a low-growing shrub that thrives in cooler climates. This plant is native to northern and western North America, often growing in higher elevation sites with rocky soil. In the home landscape, grow bearberry in full sun or partial shade, with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil.

Bearberry has tough, glossy leaves that remain evergreen throughout the year. In the spring, clusters of small drooping white flowers bloom. The flowers are bell-shaped and attract hummingbirds. Fruit-eating birds enjoy the berries that develop later in the summer. Plants stay low, spread slowly, and make a good ground cover.

Beebalm

Close-up of blooming Monarda didyma in the garden, against a blurry background. Monarda didyma, commonly known as Bee balm or Oswego tea, is a herbaceous perennial plant. It features lance-shaped, aromatic leaves that are dark green and have a slightly rough texture. The leaves are opposite, meaning they grow in pairs along the stems. Above the foliage of the monard, didyma produces spectacular tubular flowers of a bright red hue. The flowers grow in dense clusters at the top of the stems, attracting bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Beebalm’s scarlet-red flowers attract hummingbirds, while its mint-scented leaves deter pests.
BOTANICAL NAME Monarda didyma
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Beebalm, or scarlet beebalm, is a perennial wildflower native to eastern North America. It grows best in full sun but will tolerate partial shade. Plant it in moist, well-drained soil. Beebalm is easily grown from seed and will spread by self-seeding and rapidly growing underground stolons. If colonies grow too large or thick, they can be thinned by hand-pulling unwanted plants.

Scarlet beebalm produces copious dense clusters of scarlet-red blossoms. Each individual flower is a narrow tubular shape. With so many flowers per plant, there are plenty of feeding opportunities to keep hummingbirds and other pollinators returning for more. Beebalm is a member of the mint family, so the leaves have a distinctive aroma when crushed, which can deter deer and rabbits.

Blue Lobelia

Close-up of blooming Lobelia siphilitica in the garden. Lobelia siphilitica, commonly known as Great Blue Lobelia, is a herbaceous perennial plant. It features long, lance-shaped leaves that are green deep and grow in a whorled arrangement along the stem. The leaves have a slightly serrated edge and a smooth texture. Above the foliage, Lobelia siphilitica produces striking, vibrant blue flowers that are tubular in shape. The flowers grow in tall, erect racemes and are close to the stem.
Blue lobelia, a showy native wildflower, prefers moist soil and attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.
BOTANICAL NAME Lobelia siphilitica
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Blue lobelia, also known as blue cardinal flower, is a very showy wildflower native to eastern North America. This perennial plant will grow well in cooler northern climates in full sun. In warmer southern climates, it is best grown with partial shade. Soil should be constantly moist, as this plant is not tolerant of dry conditions. However, it tolerates rather wet soil and would grow well alongside streams and ponds.

Blue lobelia blooms during mid to late summer. The stunning pale purple flowers bloom along tall spikes. Because each plant can produce massive flowering stalks, they may need to be staked to stay upright. The flowers are uniquely shaped and very attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. Plants will naturalize and spread over time, forming very showy colonies.

Blue Sage

Close-up of a flowering Salvia azurea plant against a blurred green background. Salvia azurea, commonly known as Blue Sage or Azure Sage, is a perennial herbaceous plant. It has slender stems that are covered in gray-green, lance-shaped leaves. The flowers of Salvia azurea are small and tubular, pale blue in color, collected in tall spiky clusters at the tops of the stems.
Blue sage is a low-maintenance native wildflower with pale purplish-blue flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Salvia azurea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 3 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Blue sage is a low-maintenance wildflower native to the southeastern United States. It grows best in full sun with dry to medium-moisture soil. Plants do best in very well-drained soil and are not tolerant of boggy conditions. Blue sage is tolerant of drought, deer, and poor-quality soil. Grow it in a naturalized area, prairie garden, or butterfly garden.

The flowers of blue sage are pale purplish-blue. They grow in loose spikes and bloom from mid-summer through mid-fall. The flowers are showy and attract both hummingbirds and butterflies. Removing spent flower stalks can help prolong the blooming period, and if flower stalks grow long and top-heavy, use stakes or cages to help keep them upright.

Buttonbush

Close-up of a flowering plant Cephalanthus occidentalis in a sunny garden, against a blurry background. Cephalanthus occidentalis, commonly known as Buttonbush, is a deciduous shrub. It has a rounded, compact form with glossy, dark green leaves that are opposite in arrangement. The leaves are lance-shaped. The flowers are small, spherical and tightly clustered together, resembling round buttons. The flowers are white or creamy in color and have long, protruding styles, giving them a striking appearance.
Buttonbush is a native shrub that thrives in moist soil and blooms with spherical white flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Cephalanthus occidentalis
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 5 to 12 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Consider growing a buttonbush if you have a larger area with consistently moist soil. This native shrub grows best in moist to wet soil and can be planted in a poorly drained area where other plants struggle to grow. Buttonbush grows well in full sun or partial shade. In its natural environment, buttonbush often grows along a forested edge near a pond, stream, or other low, moist area.

Buttonbush blooms in early to mid-summer. The flowers are spherical white orbs, like little pincushions or fluffy snowballs. The highly fragrant flowers attract hummingbirds and many butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. After flowering, round, reddish-brown seedheads adorn the shrub, lasting into the autumn months.

Cardinal Flower

Close-up of a flowering plant Lobelia cardinalis in the garden, against the backdrop of greenery. Lobelia cardinalis, commonly known as Cardinal Flower, is a herbaceous perennial plant. The plant has lanceolate dark green leaves with serrated edges. The leaves are arranged in a rosette at the bottom of the plant and along the stem. Lobelia has bright red, tubular, five-petaled flowers that grow in dense, erect racemes.
Cardinal flower is a vibrant, hummingbird-attracting plant with scarlet-red tubular flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Lobelia cardinalis
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

Cardinal flower is very showy and extremely attractive to hummingbirds. The bright scarlet-red flowers are tubular with prominent surrounding lobes. Flowers bloom from mid to late summer and make a spectacular addition to your hummingbird garden or along a moist streamside.

Cardinal flower is a plant that needs constant soil moisture. It does well in full sun in cooler climates, but it prefers a bit of afternoon shade in warmer climates. Plants can be started from seed and will self-seed in ideal conditions. Over time, clusters of cardinal flowers fill small areas, but since this is a short-lived perennial, colonies rarely become too dense.

Columbine

Close-up of a flowering plant Aquilegia canadensis on a blurred green background. Aquilegia canadensis, or Eastern Red Columbine, is a North American perennial plant with lobed bluish-green leaves. Its unique and showy flowers have five spur petals, with blue outer petals and white inner petals.
Columbine is an early-blooming perennial with unique pale red flowers that attract hummingbirds.
BOTANICAL NAME Aquilegia canadensis
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Columbine is an early spring-blooming perennial wildflower native to eastern North America. It has showy pale red flowers with yellow centers. The flowers are very uniquely shaped and hang on the stems, nodding downwards. Early-season hummingbirds will visit the flowers, performing extra acrobatics to access the nectar inside.

Columbine does best in a location with moist, well-drained soil and partial shade but also grows well in full sun. The leaves may stay green throughout the growing season in cooler climates, but in hotter, sunnier areas, the foliage tends to brown and fade shortly after blooming. Columbine is easily grown from seed and will readily spread by self-seeding.

Coral Honeysuckle

Close-up of a flowering plant Lonicera sempervirens against a blurred green background. Lonicera sempervirens, also known as Trumpet Honeysuckle or Coral Honeysuckle, is a vine native to the United States. It features evergreen, oval-shaped leaves. The plant produces vibrant clusters of tubular flowers in shades of red, orange, and coral.
Coral honeysuckle is a versatile vine with red tube-like flowers that attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
BOTANICAL NAME Lonicera sempervirens
PLANT TYPE Vine
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 8 to 15 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Coral honeysuckle is a vigorously growing vine that looks beautiful growing up a tall trellis, arbor, or climbing along a fence. This plant is native to the southeastern United States, growing in moist, open woodlands. It grows well in full sun or partial shade with rich, moist, well-drained soil.

Coral honeysuckle blooms from mid-spring until mid-summer. The flowers are bright red, long, and tube-like, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies. Coral honeysuckle is also a butterfly larval host plant. After flowering, vines bear small reddish-orange fruits which persist through the summer. If vines become too large for the allotted space, they can be pruned back after flowering.

Fire Pink

Close-up of a flowering Silene virginica plant in a garden. Silene virginica, also known as Fire Pink, is a native perennial plant found in eastern North America. It features lance-shaped leaves that form a basal rosette at the base of the plant. The stems rise above the foliage, bearing vibrant red flowers with deeply notched petals.
Fire pink is a spring wildflower with bright red flowers growing in open woodlands of eastern North America.
BOTANICAL NAME Silene virginica
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Fire pink is an attractive spring-blooming wildflower native to open woodlands and grassy thickets of eastern North America. It grows best in full sun or partial shade and dry to medium-moisture well-drained soil. This short-lived perennial plant can be grown from seed and readily self-seeds in optimal conditions.

Fire pink has bright red, 5-petaled flowers. They bloom singly atop tall flowering stems that tower above a simple leafy basal rosette. The flowers are very showy and attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Fire pink would look nice growing in a naturalized area along a woodland edge.

Fireweed

Close-up of a flowering plant Epilobium angustifolium in the garden. Epilobium angustifolium, commonly known as Fireweed, is a tall perennial plant. It has narrow, lanceolate leaves that grow in opposite pairs along the stem. The plant produces clusters of bright pink flowers.
Fireweed is a native perennial wildflower that thrives in full sun to partial shade, preferring consistently moist soil.
BOTANICAL NAME Epilobium angustifolium
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 2 to 7

Fireweed is a perennial wildflower native to northern North America. It grows best in full sun to partial shade. This plant benefits from consistently moist soil with good drainage. Fireweed can be aggressive and spread quickly. Control unwanted growth by deadheading spent flowers and pulling unwanted new seedlings. It can also be grown in a container to help control unwanted spreading.

Fireweed blooms during the summer months. Tall flowering spikes produce a loose assortment of pale pinkish-purple flowers. These flowers are showy and attract hummingbirds and insect pollinators. A large colony of fireweed in full bloom is quite impressive.

Foxglove

Close-up of a flowering Foxglove (Penstemon spp.) plant in a sunny garden. The plant has lanceolate leaves that grow in a rosette at the base of the plant. The flowers are bell-shaped, bright pink with a white throat, forming tall spike inflorescences.
Foxglove is a diverse and beautiful plant with trumpet-shaped flowers that attract hummingbirds and insects.
BOTANICAL NAME Penstemon spp.
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Foxglove, also known as beard tongue, is a varied genus (Penstemon) of plants with many beautiful species and cultivars. There are several species native across the United States, inhabiting different regions. In general, foxglove grows well in full sun to partial shade. These plants may perform well in dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil and generally tolerate browsing deer.

Foxglove comes in various colors, including white, pink, and purple. They typically bloom in spring and summer, although some varieties bloom into the early fall. The trumpet-shaped flowers attract hummingbirds and various insect pollinators, including honeybees. They can be grown from seed or divided from larger clusters as plants naturally spread over time.

Golden Currant

Close-up of a flowering Ribes aureum plant against a blurred background in a sunny garden. Ribes aureum, commonly known as Golden Currant, is a deciduous shrub native to North America. It features lobed, palmate leaves that are green in color and have a fuzzy texture. The shrub produces clusters of fragrant, bright yellow flowers. The flowers are composed of five oval petals surrounding tubular centers.
Golden currant, also called buffalo currant, is a native shrub with attractive fruits and small yellow flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Ribes aureum
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 3 to 7 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

The golden currant, also known as buffalo currant, is native to the central and western United States. This attractive deciduous shrub can be planted as part of a hedge row or in a garden area with dappled shade. It grows well in rich, dry-to-medium moisture, well-drained soil. Plants will spread by suckers to form dense colonies.

Golden currant has attractive, edible orange fruits that can be used for jellies and jams or leave them on the plant to feed the birds. The flowers are relatively small, yellow, and trumpet-like. The flowers bloom in mid to late spring and attract early-season hummingbirds and butterflies. Golden currant is susceptible to an assortment of pests and diseases. Check with your local agricultural extension agent to see if you can successfully grow this plant in your area.

Hummingbird Trumpet

Close-up of a flowering Epilobium canum plant in a garden. It has narrow, lance-shaped leaves that are grayish-green and often have a slightly fuzzy texture. The plant produces tubular red-orange flowers that are profuse and showy, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hummingbird trumpet, a native shrub with bright red-orange tubular flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Epilobium canum
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Hummingbird trumpet, sometimes called California fuchsia or Zauschneria, is a shrubby perennial native to the westernmost states. It grows best in full sun with dry, well-drained soil. While this plant closely resembles ornamental fuschia flowers, this species is native to the United States and non-invasive.

Hummingbird trumpet is appropriately named. The bright red-orange flowers bloom in mid to late summer and attract hummingbirds. The flowers are very showy, long, and tubular. These plants don’t mind drought, browsing deer, and poor soil conditions.

Indian Paintbrush

Close-up of a flowering Castilleja coccinea plant in a garden. Castilleja coccinea, commonly known as Indian paintbrush, is a perennial plant native to North America. It features slender, lance-shaped leaves that are green and often tinged with purple. The plant produces vibrant, tube-like flowers that come in shades of red.
Indian paintbrush is a native wildflower with showy red-orange flowers that attract hummingbirds.
BOTANICAL NAME Castilleja coccinea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 0.75 to 1.5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Indian paintbrush, or scarlet Indian paintbrush, is native to grasslands and open woodlands of central and eastern North America. It can be started from seed but can be challenging to establish in the home garden.

The challenge comes from the fact that the Indian paintbrush is semi-parasitic and requires certain other plants to grow nearby. For this reason, this plant is best grown in a larger naturalized setting that closely mimics its natural habitat.

Indian paintbrush blooms in late spring or early summer. The bright red-orange flowers resemble paintbrushes dipped in brilliantly-colored paint. These flowers are very showy and attract hummingbirds. Plants are biennial or short-lived perennials, blooming in their second year and dying back shortly thereafter.

Jewelweed

Close-up of a flowering Jewelweed plant in the garden. Impatiens capensis, also known as jewelweed or touch-me-not, is an annual plant native to North America. It has bright green, oval-shaped leaves with a slightly serrated edge. The plant produces vibrant orange flowers that resemble delicate trumpets or hanging lanterns.
Jewelweed is a fast-growing annual that features showy orange or yellow trumpet-like flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Impatiens capensis
PLANT TYPE Annual
SUN REQUIREMENTS Part shade to full shade
HEIGHT 2 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 2 to 11

Jewelweed is a fast-growing annual that thrives in rich, moist, shaded areas. This plant is ideal for streamsides, pond edges, or a rain garden. It naturally occurs throughout much of the United States, except in dry, arid regions.

Jewelweed grows into bushy herbaceous masses. Flowers bloom from early summer through frost. The flowers bloom individually along the stems. They are speckled orange or yellow and trumpet-like, delicately dangling from thin stems.

The flowers are very showy and attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators. After flowering, thickened, oblong seed capsules form. When fully ripe, the seed capsules burst open, sending seeds flying to begin new plants wherever they land.

Larkspur

Close-up of a flowering Delphinium spp. (Larkspur) in a sunny garden. Delphinium spp., commonly known as delphiniums or larkspurs, are perennial flowering plants with tall spikes of colorful flowers. The flowers are showy, blue in color, have a distinct shape, with a spur on the lower petal and a bunch of petals at the top.
Larkspur, native to North America, thrives in moist environments, blooms vibrantly, attracting hummingbirds.
BOTANICAL NAME Delphinium spp.
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 4 to 6 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 7

Many varieties of larkspur are native to different regions of North America. Larkspur is typically found in moist grasslands and open woodlands. It grows best in somewhat cooler climates. Plant larkspur in a location with full sun with medium-moisture, well-drained soil. This plant is easily grown from seed and will naturalize and spread in ideal conditions.

Larkspur typically blooms in spring or summer. Flowers are vibrant shades of pink, purple, blue, and white. The flowers are very showy and attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Taller plants may become top-heavy and require staking to stay upright. These plants also require good air circulation to stay healthy and reduce the risk of fungal leaf diseases such as powdery mildew.

Mealycup Sage

Close-up of flowering Salvia farinacea plants in a sunny garden, against a blurry background. Salvia farinacea, commonly known as mealy cup sage or blue salvia, is a perennial plant with aromatic leaves and vibrant flowers. The plant produces long thin stems with grey-green leaves covered in a powdery powdery texture. The flowers are tubular and usually dark blue to purple in color. They grow in dense vertical spikes and attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Mealycup sage thrives in full sun, has a long flowering season, and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.
BOTANICAL NAME Salvia farinacea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 1 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 8 to 10

Mealycup sage is a beautiful plant native to the prairies and meadows of the south-central United States. It is winter-hardy only in the warmest climates but can be grown as an annual in cooler climates. Mealycup sage does best in full sun or dappled shade. Give it medium-moisture, well-drained soil.

Mealycup sage has a long flowering season, blooming from mid-spring through frost. The tall spikes of deep purple flowers are somewhat trumpet-like and attract a myriad of butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds. Plants are easy to grow, low-maintenance, and are not bothered by deer.

Orange Honeysuckle

Close-up of a flowering plant Lonicera ciliosa in a sunny garden against a blue sky. Lonicera ciliosa, commonly known as orange honeysuckle or western trumpet honeysuckle, is a vine native to western North America. It features opposite, ovate to lanceolate leaves that are dark green and smooth. The plant produces clusters of tubular, orange to red flowers that are highly fragrant and attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.
Orange honeysuckle is a native plant with vibrant orange flowers that attract hummingbirds and bees.
BOTANICAL NAME Lonicera ciliosa
PLANT TYPE Vine
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 10 to 20 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 5 to 9

Orange honeysuckle is native to western North America in open woodlands and brushy thickets. It can trail along the ground as a ground cover or climb up a trellis, arbor, or fence. The bright orange flowers bloom from mid-spring through mid-summer. Flowers are long and tubular, developing in terminal clusters, and very attractive to hummingbirds and bees.

Orange honeysuckle grows best in full sun to partial shade. Plants grown in heavier shade will still do well but may not bloom as profusely. Give it rich, medium moisture, well-drained soil. Plants can be propagated from seed or cuttings. If vines become too long and cumbersome, they can be pruned back to a desired length after flowering.

Phlox

Close-up of a flowering Phlox paniculata plant in a sunny garden, against a blurred background. Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is a perennial plant native to North America. It has lance-shaped, opposite leaves that are deep green and slightly hairy. Garden phlox produces large, dense clusters of fragrant flowers in soft pink. The flowers have five petals and a tubular shape that attracts butterflies, hummingbirds and other pollinators.
Native phlox blooms in diverse colors, attracting pollinators, and requires sun, well-drained soil, and occasional maintenance.
BOTANICAL NAME Phlox paniculata
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Phlox, sometimes called garden phlox or fall phlox, is a beautiful perennial wildflower native to the central and eastern United States. It blooms from early summer until the first frost. The flowers grow in clusters and vary in color from white to pink to pale purple. Flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators.

Phlox grows best in a location with full sun to dappled shade. Plants are susceptible to powdery mildew and benefit from good air circulation. Soil should be medium moisture and well-drained. Phlox is easily grown from seed and will self-seed in the garden. Unwanted spread by seeding can be controlled by deadheading spent flowers and regular thinning of dense clusters.

Red Buckeye

Close-up of a flowering shrub Aesculus pavia in a sunny garden. Aesculus pavia, commonly known as red buckeye, is a medium-sized shrub native to the central and southeastern United States. It features large, palmately compound leaves with five leaflets arranged in a fan-like pattern. Red buckeye produces striking clusters of tubular red flowers.
Red buckeye thrives in partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. It has showy, deep pinkish-red tubular flowers.
BOTANICAL NAME Aesculus pavia
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Part shade
HEIGHT 10 to 15 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 8

Red buckeye is a medium-sized shrub native to the central and southeastern United States. This plant would be an excellent addition to a shade garden, native hedge, or forested edge. It does best in a partially shaded area with medium-moisture, well-drained soil.

The red buckeye typically forms irregularly shaped crowns with a few prominent stems and large, palmately compound leaves. The flowers bloom in the spring and are very showy. Long flowering stems develop at the terminal ends of branches, lined with deep pinkish-red flowers. The flowers are long and tube-like and perfect for foraging hummingbirds.

Red Flowering Currant

Close-up of a flowering Ribes sanguineum in a garden. Ribes sanguineum, commonly known as red-flowering currant, is a deciduous shrub native to western North America. It has lobed leaves that are green in color. The plant produces clusters of vibrant red or pink flowers. These bell-shaped flowers are attractive to hummingbirds and other pollinators.
Red flowering currant thrives in full, displaying fragrant pink flowers in spring and dark purple fruits in summer.
BOTANICAL NAME Ribes sanguineum
PLANT TYPE Deciduous shrub
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 5 to 12 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 6 to 8

Red flowering currant is an attractive shrub native to western North America. Check with your local agricultural extension agent to determine if currant and gooseberry plants are permitted in your region, as these plants have been associated with carrying and spreading white pine blister rust.

If currants are permitted in your area, they can be grown in full sun with rich, moist, well-drained soil.

The red-flowering currant has beautiful pink flowers that bloom in the spring. The flowers are fragrant and very attractive to hummingbirds. Rough, round, dark purple fruits form in summer and are eaten by birds and small mammals. Currants have good fall colors and can be enjoyed in the autumn landscape.

Rough Blazing Star

Close-up of a Liatris aspera flowering plant against a blurred green background. Liatris aspera, commonly known as rough blazing star, is a perennial wildflower. The plant forms tall spikelets of showy flowers. These flowers are densely clustered and purple in color to attract butterflies and other pollinators.
Rough blazing star is a showy native wildflower that blooms from mid-summer to frost.
BOTANICAL NAME Liatris aspera
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 3 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 8

Rough blazing star is an extremely showy wildflower native to central and eastern North America. Blazing star is a typical plant in tallgrass prairies, meadows, and open woodlands. It grows best in full sun with dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. This native plant is drought-tolerant but will not tolerate constantly wet soil.

Rough blazing star blooms from mid-summer through the first frost. Tall showy flower spikes produce dense clusters of pale purple flowers that appear rounded and densely feathery. The flowers are very attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. After flowering, rough, brown seedheads appear, which are ornamental and enjoyed by seed-eating birds.

Scarlet Gilia

Close-up of a black butterfly on a flowering Scarlet Gilia plant, against a blurred green background. Ipomopsis spp., commonly known as skyrocket or standing-cypress, is a genus of flowering plants that includes several species. The flowers are tubular in shape and have a bright red color. They bloom in clusters along tall, upright stems, attracting hummingbirds and other pollinators.
Scarlet Gilia produces tall spikes of bright red flowers that attract hummingbirds throughout the summer.
BOTANICAL NAME Ipomopsis spp.
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 2 to 5 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 6 to 9

Scarlet Gilia is a beautiful native wildflower. I. aggregata is native to the western states, while I. rubra is native to the southeastern states. Both produce tall flowering spikes of bright red, tubular flowers. These flowers are very showy and attract hummingbirds. Flowers bloom throughout the summer months.

Grow scarlet gilia in a garden location with full sun. This plant is drought-tolerant and deer resistant and would do well as part of a rock garden, perennial garden, pollinator garden, or native wildflower garden. Soil should be dry to medium moisture and very well-drained. Plants will naturalize in ideal conditions and spread by self-seeding.

Scarlet Sage

Salvia coccinea, also known as scarlet sage or tropical sage, is an herbaceous perennial plant. The leaves of Salvia coccinea are lance-shaped and have a bright green color. The flowers are tubular in shape and grow in dense clusters, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.
With its brilliant red flowers, Scarlet sage blooms from mid-summer to early fall.
BOTANICAL NAME Salvia coccinea
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun
HEIGHT 1 to 2 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 8 to 10

Scarlet sage, also known as Texas sage, has brilliant red flowers that bloom from mid-summer through early fall. The flowers bloom in loose clusters along flowering spikes and are tube-shaped. Hummingbirds and butterflies love these flowers and will visit frequently during their long blooming period.

Scarlet sage does best in full sun but will tolerate light, dappled shade, especially in hotter climates. Grow it in medium-moisture, well-drained soil. Scarlet sage is easy to grow and low-maintenance. Plants can be started from seed and will self-seed in ideal conditions. Deer do not bother this plant.

Trumpet Creeper

Close-up of a Campsis radicans flowering plant against a blurred green background. Campsis radicans, also known as trumpet vine or trumpet creeper, is a vigorous deciduous vine native to North America. The plant has large tubular flowers of bright red-orange color. The leaves of Campsis radicans are compound and arranged in opposite pairs along the stems. The flowers bloom in clusters and are very attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.
Trumpet creeper is a fast-growing vine that thrives in full sun, attracts hummingbirds, and requires pruning.
BOTANICAL NAME Campsis radicans
PLANT TYPE Vine
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 25 to 40 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 4 to 9

Trumpet creeper is a familiar vine native to the southeastern United States. It will readily grow up trees, along fences, or over arbors. It is a fast-growing and vigorous vine, so be prepared to give it plenty of growing space! Unwanted extra runners must be pruned regularly to prevent them from spreading thickly through an area. Mature vines can grow very thick and heavy.

Trumpet creeper does very well in either full sun or partial shade. This plant is not picky about soil type and is not bothered by browsing deer. Trumpet creeper blooms in mid-summer. The flowers are large and showy, growing in clusters along the vines. Hummingbirds willingly visit these long, tubular flowers.

Wild Bergamot

Close-up of Monarda fistulosa flowering plants in the garden. Monarda fistulosa, also known as wild bergamot or bee balm, is a herbaceous perennial plant native to North America. It features lance-shaped leaves with a minty aroma. The flowers of Monarda fistulosa are tubular and grow in dense clusters at the top of leafy stems. They range in color from lavender to purple and are highly attractive to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.
Wild bergamot blooms tube-like flowers attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.
BOTANICAL NAME Monarda fistulosa
PLANT TYPE Herbaceous perennial
SUN REQUIREMENTS Full sun to part shade
HEIGHT 2 to 4 feet
HARDINESS ZONES 3 to 9

Wild bergamot is a mint family member with fragrant leaves, stems, and flowers. The flowers bloom from mid-summer until the first frost and draw in hummingbirds, butterflies, and various other pollinators. The blossoms are pale purple and tube-like, growing in clusters at the tops of the leafy stems.

Grow wild bergamot in full sun, although it will tolerate some light afternoon shade. This plant grows best in dry to medium-moisture, well-drained soil. It is resistant to deer and drought and will accept poor soil conditions. Plants are easily grown from seed and will self-seed in the garden. Thin densely crowded colonies to reduce unwanted spread and also improve air circulation.

Final Thoughts

Native plants are beautiful additions to the landscape. Many are low-maintenance and easy to grow. Native plants also benefit populations of birds and butterflies, and there are plenty of showy native plants favored by hummingbirds. You can attract hummingbirds by planting many nectar-rich plants that bloom from spring through fall.

You can improve your hummingbird-friendly habitat by providing a water source and perches and keeping your cats inside. Once you have established your plantings, you can enjoy the colorful blossoms, lush foliage, and lively hummingbirds and butterflies that will frequent your garden.

SHARE THIS POST
A bleeding heart vine displays luscious green leaves and vivid white and red flowers, basking in the warm sunlight, creating a picturesque scene of natural beauty.

Flowers

How to Plant, Grow, and Care For Bleeding Heart Vine

Bleeding heart vines are a wonderful tropical plant that produces unique white and red flowers. This tender perennial can be grown outdoors in warm climates or grown in containers and brought indoors in cooler climates. It looks stunning on a trellis as well as hanging baskets. Gardening expert Kelli Klein explains how to care for this vine both indoors and out.

Begonia Grown Indoors

Flowers

Are Begonias Annual, Biennial, or Perennial Plants?

Thinking of adding some begonias to your garden, but want to know if they are annuals, perennials, or biennials before you start planting? These are common questions for flower gardeners of all experience levels. Find out what you can expect from these beautiful flowers, and how many seasons they will actually stick around for!

fall mums alive

Flowers

10 Tips For Keeping Your Fall Mums Alive This Season

Do you struggle to keep your fall chrysanthemums alive during the blooming season? Fall mums are picky plants, and it's not uncommon to see them die quickly if not properly cared for. In this article, gardening expert Liessa Bowen shares her top tips to keep your mums alive this fall.

pollinator friendly roses

Flowers

21 Pollinator Friendly Roses to Grow This Season

Are you working on a pollinator garden? These beneficial bugs are an important component of your garden’s ecosystem, and you can lure them in with roses! While not all roses are attractive to pollinators, many varieties are frequently-visited favorites. In this article, gardening expert and rose enthusiast Danielle Sherwood shares her top 21 roses for a beautiful and beneficial pollinator garden.

White Dahlia in Garden

Flowers

21 White Dahlia Varieties to Grow This Season

Looking for some white dahlia varieties to plant in your flower garden this season but aren't quite sure where to start? There are many different types of dahlias that bloom with beautiful white flowers. In this article, we take a look at our favorite white dahlia varieties that you can grow this season!