39 Delicious Winter Vegetables You Can Grow Indoors

If you’re looking to stay busy growing plants this winter, why not try growing some veggies indoors? Join vegetable farmer Briana Yablonski as she covers 39 winter vegetables you can grow indoors.

Assorted leafy greens in dark containers, soaking up the sun's rays, showcasing a vibrant mix of hues and textures. Lush purple and green foliage flourishes, creating a beautiful contrast against the black pots.

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Just because dark and cold winter days have arrived, it doesn’t mean you have to stop growing vegetables! With ingenuity, a good grow light, and some patience, you can grow many of your favorite vegetables indoors this winter.

The following winter veggies grow well indoors, but you’ll still need to provide the proper light, water, and nutrients to help your plants thrive. And since they can tolerate cold temperatures, you don’t have to worry about cranking up the heat.

Seeds Featured in This Article

Arugula

Our Rating

Astro Arugula/Rocket Seeds

Beets

Our Rating

Gourmet Blend Beet Seeds

Broccoli

Our Rating

Burgundy Broccoli Seeds

Cabbage

Our Rating

Copenhagen Market Cabbage Seeds

Carrots

Our Rating

Carnival Blend Carrot Seeds

Cauliflower

Our Rating

Romanesco Cauliflower Seeds

Collards

Our Rating

Georgia Southern Collards Seeds

Kale

Our Rating

Dazzling Blue Kale Seeds

Kohlrabi

Our Rating

Purple Vienna Kohlrabi Seeds

1. Arugula ‘Astro’

Astro arugula leaves flourish abundantly in a sizable gray-painted wooden container, forming a lush, green canopy. The leaves display a peppery, slightly bitter allure, promising a flavorful addition to culinary creations.
‘Astro’ arugula is known for its peppery flavor and year-round adaptability to various temperatures.
botanical-name botanical name Eruca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 4-8 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-11

When I first started growing arugula, ‘Astro’ was my preferred variety, and it remains at the top of my list today. The greens pack a peppery and slightly bitter punch without overwhelming your taste buds. And since ‘Astro’ can tolerate cold and heat, it grows well year-round.

Arugula grows best when it receives at least eight hours of bright light, so a grow light will help it thrive throughout the winter. Try sprinkling some seeds in a planter so they’re about a quarter to half an inch apart. In about a month, the greens will be three to four inches tall and ready to cut. 

The plants will provide you with multiple harvests if you leave the small inner leaves intact. Another option is to plant multiple successions of seeds.

2. Arugula ‘Rocky’

A close-up of 'Rocky' arugula leaves glistening with water droplets, catching sunlight, highlighting their deeply lobed texture. The vibrant green foliage showcases its freshness, while the water droplets reflect the surrounding light.
‘Rocky’ arugula thrives under grow lights or in well-lit indoor spaces.
botanical-name botanical name Eruca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 4-8 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-11

If you aren’t afraid of a salad with a strong, peppery flavor, then ‘Rocky’ arugula is the green for you. This type of wild arugula has deeply lobed leaves and a strong yet complex flavor.

Since it’s ready to harvest when only a few inches tall, you can easily grow ‘Rocky’ on shelves under grow lights. Place your grow lights just a few inches above your plants to give them lots of light. Alternatively, you can grow this cold-tolerant green on a sun porch or bright windowsill.

3. Beets ‘Gourmet Beet Blend’

A close-up of a Gourmet Beet Blend beet, green leaves forming a lush canopy over cracked brown soil. The beet's striking pink stems lend structural support to the verdant foliage, a beautiful contrast against the earthy backdrop.
Growing this vegetable indoors in winter offers both vibrant roots and nutritious greens.
botanical-name botanical name Beta vulgaris
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-30 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

If you don’t have beets in storage from a fall harvest, consider growing some indoors this winter! Beets offer earthy, bright roots as well as nutritious greens. I like the ‘Gourmet Beet Blend’ mix because it contains multiple beet colors.

Be aware that each ‘seed’ contains multiple seeds! That means you can expect multiple seedlings to emerge from each larger seed capsule. If your seedlings end up closer than you’d like, remove extras to create more space.

Beetroots take more time to develop than greens, so don’t be surprised if growing big, round roots takes multiple months.

4. Bok Choy

Numerous green bok choy plants with tightly packed leaves bathing in the sunlight. The healthy, leafy vegetables grow upright, forming a dense group, showcasing their crisp, pale stalks and lush, dark green foliage in a cluster.
Bok choy is versatile in winter dishes, particularly soups and stir-fry.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-24 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

Bok choy works well in many warming winter meals, including noodle soups and stir fry.  Another great thing about bok choy is that you can eat it at any size. Harvest whole baby bok choy for soups and let a few plants grow until they’re large enough to slice and saute.

Bok choy prefers well-draining soil and lots of nitrogen, so supplement any soil mix with a boost of nitrogen-rich blood meal or feather meal. And watch for bok choy-loving aphids (yes, they can find their way indoors).

5. Broccoli ‘Burgundy’

 A sunlit burgundy broccoli stands tall, adorned with rich, dark leaves. Its striking purple hue intensifies in the sunlight, adding vibrancy to the garden. The broccoli's tightly packed clusters promise flavorful, nutrient-rich florets upon maturity.
This winter vegetable yields continuous sweet and tender purple florets.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea var. italica
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 24-36 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-10

If you have extra space in your home this winter, ‘Burgundy’ broccoli is a fun crop to experiment with. It’s a sprouting broccoli that forms many small shoots over a few weeks rather than one large crown. I love this continual growth so much that I’ve abandoned traditional broccoli in favor of sprouting broccoli.

Plus, sprouting broccoli produces super sweet and tender stems. And did I mention that ‘Burgundy’ produces gorgeous purple florets?

These plants can reach three feet tall at maturity and develop robust root systems,  so place them in a foot-deep container. Also, since they can reach three feet tall, ensure they have room to grow upward.

6. Broccoli Raab ‘Rapini’

A close-up of vibrant Rapini broccoli raab, its green leaves capturing sunlight, showcasing a cluster of buds. The leafy greens hold small, tender florets and textured stems, displaying a mix of lush foliage.
Broccoli raab yields slender stalks with small buds and a touch of bitterness.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-14 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

If you haven’t had broccoli raab before, consider it a mix between broccoli and dandelion greens. The plant produces a thin stalk with small flower buds and a slightly bitter flavor.

‘Rapini’ broccoli raab is about a foot tall at maturity, so it fits better into small spaces than traditional broccoli plants. Remember that each seed will produce a single stalk, so plant multiple seeds if you’re hoping for a family meal. I like to plant seeds about every two inches and then thin the seedlings so they’re six inches apart.

7. Cabbage ‘Copenhagen’

A close-up of a head of Copenhagen cabbage with large, light-green leaves. Dew droplets cling to the textured surface. The cabbage leaves fold in layers, showcasing their dense, crisp structure.
Grow ‘Copenhagen’ green cabbage indoors for a quick harvest in under three months.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

To grow a standard green cabbage indoors this winter, check out ‘Copenhagen.’ These plants mature in less than three months and store for up to six months after harvest.

Like most cabbages, ‘Copenhagen’ plants need lots of light and well-draining soil to develop properly. The plants are cold-tolerant, so you can even grow them on a covered porch or in a garage if you supply them with a grow light.

8. Cabbage ‘Red Acre’

A red acre cabbage sits nestled in rich brown soil. Its dense, deep green leaves contrast beautifully with striking purple stems and intricate veins, creating a captivating visual display in the garden's earthy backdrop.
‘Red Acre’ cabbage thrives indoors with proper lighting and pest monitoring.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

‘Red Acre’ is a compact red cabbage that develops two to four-pound heads. Its smaller size makes it a great option for container planting, so you can easily grow it indoors.

Unless you have an area that receives eight hours of daily light, use a grow light to ensure this cabbage receives the light it needs to form heads. Aim to keep the soil moderately moist and regularly check the plants for pests like aphids, thrips, and spider mites.

9. Carrots ‘Carnival Blend’

Green leaves and stems of Carnival Blend carrots are bathed in sunlight, creating a captivating close-up. The leaves exhibit a delicate feathery texture, intricately branching out, while the stems convey a robust and healthy presence.
These carrots offer a colorful twist to your garden with their mix of vibrant hues.
botanical-name botanical name Daucus carota
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 10-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-10

Whether you want to entice your kids with fun and colorful veggies or just want to try something new, ‘Carnival Blend’ carrots delight. This seed mixture contains a blend of orange, yellow, pink, purple, red, and white carrots. 

Since these carrots can grow over eight inches long, plant them in a deep container filled with well-draining mix. Carrot seeds can take up to two weeks to germinate, so keep the soil moist until you see seedlings emerging.

Provide the plants with at least eight hours of daily light, water when the top inch of soil is dry, and thin seedlings one to two inches apart.

10. Carrots ‘Scarlet Nantes’

Scarlet Nantes carrots, slender and vibrant, peeking out from the rich, dark soil. Their leafy green foliage forms a dense canopy, the vivid hues contrasting against the earthy background, while thin, delicate stems support the vibrant foliage.
‘Scarlet Nantes’ carrots offer sweet, crunchy goodness and mature in just over two months.
botanical-name botanical name Daucus carota
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 10-18 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-10

These traditional orange carrots provide sweet, crunchy snacks and lend themselves well to dishes like honey-glazed carrots and sweet carrot soup. And since ‘Scarlet Nantes’ carrots mature in just over two months, you can plant them in early winter and harvest them before spring arrives.

The roots grow up to seven inches long, so choose a container at least ten inches deep. Make sure to utilize a well-draining potting mix and avoid applying excess nitrogen, which can lead to robust greens but spindly roots.

11. Carrots ‘Tonda di Parigi’

Emerging from the dark soil, Tonda di Parigi carrots display deep orange tones, complemented by verdant leaves and stems. The contrast of the vibrant carrots against the rich greenery encapsulates the allure of these carrots in their growing environment.
These plants’ round roots are ideal for shallow containers with careful seedling spacing.
botanical-name botanical name Daucus carota
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 10-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-10

Don’t have the room for full-sized carrots? Then turn to the cute Parisian ‘Tonda di Parigi’ carrots. These plants produce stubby round roots that are only an inch or two long, which means they work well in shallow containers.

Like all carrots, these plants prefer full sun and well-draining yet moist soil. Although this variety produces short roots, you should still thin the seedlings so they’re a few inches apart. This will allow the plants to form chunky, round roots.

12. Cauliflower ‘Romanesco’

A close-up of a romanesco cauliflower, showcasing its intricate, fractal-like florets in a striking spiral pattern. Its light green leaves provide a beautiful contrast, gently cradling the pyramid-shaped vegetable.
‘Romanesco’ cauliflower requires ample indoor space but rewards with a sweet, nutty flavor.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea var. botrytis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 24-36 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

If you ask me, ‘Romanesco’ is one of the most beautiful vegetables. And I find most people agree. The plant produces bright green fractal florets arranged in a larger fractal pattern.

And not only are these plants beautiful, but they also produce a sweet and slightly nutty flavor. Like most types of cauliflower, ‘Romanesco’ exceeds three feet tall and wide at maturity. Ensure you have enough room to grow this plant indoors before planting your winter seeds.

13. Collards ‘Georgia Southern’

A cluster of Georgia Southern collards with lush, dark green leaves. The leaves are broad, ribbed, and slightly crinkled, displaying a glossy texture. Their edges are frilled, forming an attractive and dense leafy cluster.
‘Georgia Southern’ requires a spacious pot, cool temperatures, and six hours of daily bright light.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea var. botrytis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 24-36 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

Is it really winter if you don’t eat your fill of collard greens? Many of my neighbors would answer no.

If you missed planting collard greens this fall, you can still grow them indoors in winter. I recommend planting ‘Georgia Southern’ seeds in a pot that is at least a foot tall and wide because a healthy collard plant is an impressive sight.

Collards don’t mind cool temperatures and become even tastier after they’ve experienced cold, so don’t worry about keeping them warm after they’ve passed the seedling stage. However, provide at least six hours of bright light each day.

14. Dandelion Greens

A gardener harvests dandelion greens for fresh winter salad.
Indoor-grown dandelion greens offer a bitter, versatile flavor for cooking throughout the winter.
botanical-name botanical name Taraxacum officinale
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 24-36 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 2-10

Yes, you can eat dandelion greens! While winter may have killed the dandelion greens sprinkled throughout your yard, you can still plant these bitter greens indoors during the darker months.

Dandelion greens offer a bitter flavor not everyone loves, but I find them delightful when they are cooked with a bit of vinegar and sprinkled with hard cheese. Harvest the outer leaves so the small inner leaves can keep growing and provide you with multiple harvests.

15. Endive

A group of endive heads clustered closely, their elongated leaves arranged in overlapping layers, catching sunlight. The leaves exhibit deep green hues with ruffled edges, forming a tightly packed and slightly curled ensemble.
Tying up the head of endives during the last week of growth enhances tenderness.
botanical-name botanical name Cichorium endivia
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 4-6 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

If you love the flavor of bitter greens, endive is a must-have for your indoor winter garden. This leafy green is closely related to radicchio but brings a fun curly texture to salads and wilted greens.

This plant is cold-tolerant, so you don’t have to worry about cranking up the heat. However, it requires full sun and well-draining soil to thrive. Since it remains short as it forms a head, you can try growing it in a window box next to a bright window or under a grow light.

Tying up the head with a string or rubber band during the last week of growth will lead to tender and blanched inner leaves.

16. Kale ‘Dazzling Blue’

A 'Dazzling Blue' kale stands tall, its striking leaves spreading out. The kale's purple and deep green hues gleam in the sunlight, exhibiting textured edges and prominent veining. The garden's other plants form a blurred backdrop.
‘Dazzling Blue’ kale offers striking leaves and continuous harvesting possibilities.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea  subsp. acephala
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 18-24 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

A type of lacinato kale with striking leaves, ‘Dazzling Blue’ lives up to its name. I typically grow this type of kale for mature leaves, but you can also harvest the leaves when they’re only a few inches tall. As long as you leave the interior leaves intact, the plant will continue to produce new greens.

If you want to grow mature kale leaves, choose a pot that is at least a foot deep and provide your plants with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer.

17. Kale ‘Red Russian’

A close-up of a sunlit Red Russian kale leaf with a deep green color and purple edges. The textured surface of the leaf is deeply ruffled, creating intricate patterns across its surface, basking in sunlight.
This vegetable is ideal for salads due to its tenderness.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea  subsp. acephala
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 18-24 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Red Russian’ kale is more tender than other kale varieties, so it’s my choice for kale salads. You can harvest the baby greens when just a few inches tall or let them mature into larger leaves.

If you’re growing ‘Red Russian’ for baby greens, sprinkle the seeds in a wide container like a window box. Choose a container that’s at least a foot deep if you want to grow mature kale plants.

18. Kohlrabi ‘Purple Vienna’

A close-up of a Purple Vienna kohlrabi, showcasing its light green color. The kohlrabi's distinct bulb and surrounding green leaves add to its visual allure, with the blurred background hinting at a plentiful harvest.
‘Purple Vienna’ kohlrabi is a crunchy, sweet stem perfect for indoor gardens.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica oleracea  subsp. gongylodes
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Kohlrabi is closely related to cabbage and kale, but people grow it for its enlarged stem rather than its greens. The stem is crunchy, sweet, and tender, with a flavor reminiscent of a broccoli stem.

Since ‘Purple Vienna’ kohlrabi remains smaller than broccoli and cauliflower, I think it’s a great alternative for the indoor winter garden. Choose a container at least ten inches deep, fill it with a well-draining and nutrient-rich potting mix, and keep the soil moist.

As long as the plants receive adequate water and full sun, they’ll mature in about two months.

19. Lettuce ‘Buttercrunch Butterhead’

A head of buttercrunch butterhead lettuce stands in the sunlight, its wide leaves extending gracefully. The blurred background showcases a brown mulched ground, highlighting the green hue of the lettuce leaves.
‘Buttercrunch Butterhead’ lettuce is an easy container crop with various textures and colors.
botanical-name botanical name Lactuca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 6-8 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Lettuce is a must-have crop in your winter indoor garden. It’s easy to grow in a container, and the many varieties mean you can mix and match colors and textures.

One of my favorite types of lettuce is butterhead due to the soft, buttery leaves that work great for lettuce wraps, sandwiches, and salads. ‘Buttercrunch Butterhead’ mixes the delightfully soft texture with a bit of crunch.

Although I sometimes hear people say lettuce can grow in the shade, it actually prefers full sun. If you don’t have a bright area in your home, provide supplemental light with a grow light.

20. Lettuce ‘Ezrilla’

A mound of freshly cut Ezrilla lettuce leaves, displaying a vibrant green color and delicate, frilly edges. The leaves are tender and curved, forming a textured pile that invites crispness and freshness.
‘Ezrilla’ lettuce offers convenient individual leaves perfect for hassle-free salads.
botanical-name botanical name Lactuca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 4-6 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

If you love eating salads but don’t enjoy the work of cleaning and chipping lettuce heads or harvesting baby greens, check out ‘Ezrilla.’ This lettuce variety produces frilly, green heads that separate into individual leaves when cut.

‘Ezrilla’ remains under six inches tall, so you don’t need much room to grow it indoors. Try tucking it into a shallow planter like a window box and placing the box on a shelf under grow lights.

21. Lettuce ‘New Red Fire’

A close-up of a New Red Fire lettuce, bathed in sunlight, showcasing its lush green leaves with striking deep red edges. The radiant sunlight highlights the intricate details of the lettuce's texture and coloration.
This lettuce variety requires ample space due to its taller growth.
botanical-name botanical name Lactuca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 8-10 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

‘New Red Fire’ is one of my favorite types of lettuce to grow. It’s a stunning combination of red and green and holds up to environmental stressors and disease.

The heads grow a bit taller than other types of lettuce, so make sure you account for this before planting it indoors.

22. Lettuce ‘Vivian Romaine’

A group of Vivian Romaine lettuces standing against a blurred dark surface. The leaves seem broad, textured, and layered, showcasing the typical Romaine lettuce structure and bright green color.
The ‘Vivian’ romaine lettuce produces dense, bright green heads suitable for Caesar salads.
botanical-name botanical name Lactuca sativa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

‘Vivian Romaine’ offers dense, bright green heads perfect for a Ceasar salad. Full romaine heads mature in about 50 days, but you can harvest smaller baby greens anytime.

If you want to grow impressive romaine heads, give the plants at least eight inches of space in a container at least six inches deep. Place the plants near a bright window or use a grow light for more rapid growth.

23. Microgreens ‘Cilantro’

Lush green cilantro plants reach towards the sun, thriving in a brown cement pot, their delicate leaves swaying in the breeze. The vibrant herbs promise a burst of fresh flavor for culinary delights.
Plant cilantro this winter for a burst of flavor in dishes like tacos or curries.
botanical-name botanical name Coriandrum sativum
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 2-4 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Looking to add a pop of flavor to tacos, ramen, or curry? Then plant some micro cilantro this winter!

Cilantro microgreens take less time and space to grow than the larger herbs, but they provide the same flavor. I like to grow my microgreens in a special 10” x 20” tray designed for microgreens, but you can also plant them in another shallow planter.

24. Microgreens ‘Umami Asian Blend’

A close-up of Umami Asian blend leaves showcases their vivid green hues, glistening with delicate water droplets. The fuzzy texture of the leaves adds depth, catching the light in a mesmerizing play of shadows and highlights.
Even in a small apartment, you can grow ‘Umami Asian Blend’ indoors.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica species
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 2-4 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Even if you live in a tiny studio apartment, you can still grow some microgreens indoors this winter. These tiny crops take up little space, yet they impart a big flavor. The ‘Umami Asian Blend’ contains a mix of various greens, including mustard greens and bok choy.

Since you’ll harvest microgreens when they’re only a few inches tall, densely plant the seeds if you hope to have enough greens for a salad or sandwich. Choose a container that’s only an inch or two deep, fill it with a well-draining potting mix, sprinkle the seeds so they’re half an inch apart, and cover with a light dusting of soil. 

Since the tender microgreens are prone to rot, I like to water them by placing their pot in another pot filled with water. Succession plant the quick-growing greens to have a supply of them on hand throughout the winter.

25. Mizuna ‘Mizuna’

A cluster of Mizuna vegetables, their lush green leaves arranged closely, basks in the warm embrace of sunlight. Each leaf exhibits an elegant elongation, and its edges feature intricate serrations, adding a delightful texture to the overall composition.
‘Mizuna’ is a fast-growing, tender green similar to bok choy and mustard greens.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. niposinica
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 4-12 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Mizuna’ is a quick-growing and tender green similar to bok choy and mustard greens. You can plant the seeds an inch or so apart and harvest them as baby greens or give them a bit more space so they can grow into mature plants.

Keep an eye on the plants for pesky critters like aphids and spider mites, which love to suck the plant’s juices. When it comes time to harvest, you can cut the entire place at the base or cut an inch above the ground so the greens keep growing.

26. Mustard Greens ‘Red Giant’

A grouping of black pot trays showcases red giant mustard greens, their lush leaves displaying a rich maroon hue. Green labels affixed to the dark soil bring order and identification to this thriving collection of greens.
These vegetables boast deep maroon leaves and a stronger flavor than typical greens.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica juncea
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-24 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

You’ve read that right; not all mustard greens are green! ‘Red Giant’ plants produce deep maroon leaves but have the pungent flavor of all mustards. In fact, they pack a greater punch than their more common green cousins.

‘Red Giant’ plants can grow up to two feet tall, so one plant can easily serve as an entire meal. However, you can also harvest the greens when they’re only a few inches tall. I like these baby greens since they’re supremely tender and a bit more mild.

27. Napa Cabbage ‘One Kilo Slow Bolt’

A close-up of a One Kilo Slow Bolt Napa Cabbage catching the sunlight. Its broad, light green leaves unfurl elegantly, displaying a ruffled texture. The cabbage's form showcases overlapping layers, culminating in a spherical structure.
Napa cabbage matures quickly and has tender leaves that are perfect for slaws or kimchi.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Napa cabbage has a similar flavor to other types of cabbage, but it’s a bit more tender and faster to mature. The crunchy green leaves taste great sauteed, eaten raw in a slaw, or fermented into kimchi.

Although you can harvest ‘One Kilo Slow Bolt’ anytime, waiting until the heads are fully mature will provide the biggest harvest. I like to gently touch the top of the heads and harvest them once they’re firm.

This cabbage likes lots of light and well-draining soil, so use a soilless potting mix and supplement light with a grow light. Mixing a nitrogen-rich fertilizer into the potting mix will help the plant grow healthy green leaves.

28. Radicchio ‘Palla Rossa Mavrik’

A single Palla Rossa Mavrik Radicchio, positioned against a cluster of blurred radicchios. The elongated vegetable boasts glossy, deep purple leaves, forming a vivid and textured appearance within the composition.
‘Palla Rossa Mavrik’ radicchio offers deep red leaves with a bitter flavor.
botanical-name botanical name Cichorium intybus
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 8-12 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Palla Rossa Mavrik’ is a Chioggia-type radicchio with deep red leaves and white veins. It provides a slightly bitter flavor that pairs excellently with winter citrus and rich cheese.

Since radicchio forms head and develops color best in cool weather, avoid placing it in a warm area of your home. You can even put it on a covered porch or in a garage, as long as you provide light with a grow light.

29. Radish ‘French Breakfast’

French breakfast radishes grow in rows, their red roots peeking from the dried mulch-covered ground. The leaves reach towards the sunlight, basking in its warmth, as they contribute to the flourishing garden ecosystem.
Winter radishes like ‘French Breakfast’ are perfect for indoor growing due to their quick growth.
botanical-name botanical name Raphanus sativus
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 3-4 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

Radishes are some of my favorite crops to grow indoors during the winter. They’re quick-growing, tolerant of various temperatures, and fun to harvest. And the mild flavor of ‘French Breakfast’ means it’s easy to incorporate them into your meals.

‘French Breakfast’ roots grow only a few inches long, so you can plant them in a pot that’s only four or six inches deep. I find window boxes work great. Space the seeds about an inch apart and keep the soil moist as the radishes grow.

If you provide enough light, water, and nutrients, you can harvest the radishes about a month after planting.

30. Radish ‘Easter Egg’

Easter egg radishes peek through rich, dark soil, showcasing their vibrant hues. Their roots boast a lovely shade of pink, contrasting beautifully with their delicate, light green stems. These radishes are a stunning blend of colors.
Growing ‘Easter Egg’ radishes is a colorful and kid-friendly indoor activity.
botanical-name botanical name Raphanus sativus
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 3-4 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Easter Egg’ radishes produce a mixture of white, pink, red, and purple roots, which means they’re a particularly fun radish to grow with kids. And since the seeds are large enough for kids to see and forgive mistakes, you can involve young ones in the planting process.

After the seedlings emerge, thin them to an inch or two apart. Water when the top inch of soil is dry and provide at least eight hours of bright light each day.

31. Radish ‘Mantanghong Watermelon’

Emerging from brown soil, Mantanghong watermelon radishes display a pale green exterior, concealing their striking interior. Surrounding them, towering green stems and lush leaves add depth to their budding presence in the earth.
This radish variety offers a crunchy and versatile addition to meals.
botanical-name botanical name Raphanus sativus
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 6-12 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Mantanghong Watermelon’ radishes produce two-inch wide roots with green exteriors and bright pink interiors. They’re super crunchy and great for eating raw, pickling, or cooking.

Since the greens and roots of these radishes grow larger than others, make sure you give them enough space. I recommend choosing a container that is at least six inches deep. The larger size means they’ll take a bit longer to mature; expect to wait two months before harvesting.

32. Rutabaga ‘American Purple Top’

Two partially emerged American purple top rutabaga sit nestled in dark soil, displaying a muted, deep purple hue. Nearby, assorted weeds grow amidst the garden bed, adding contrast to the scene.
Growing rutabagas indoors in winter takes time, patience, and cool temperatures.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica napus
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 16-20 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-8

Gardeners typically sow rutabagas seeds in the summer and harvest the nutty roots in the late fall. But if you’ve missed out on growing rutabaga outdoors, there’s no rule saying you can’t try to grow them indoors this winter.

Before you plant them, note they take three to four months to mature. But if you have the time and patience, give them a go.

Fill a container with well-draining soil and provide at least eight hours of daily bright light. Choose a cooler area of your house since these plants prefer lower temperatures. 

33. Scallions ‘Tokyo Long’

Rows of Tokyo long scallions stand upright in rich brown soil. Their slender, green stems reach towards the sky.  These scallions show signs of healthy growth and promise a flavorful harvest soon.
These grow quickly and offer a familiar onion taste without the wait for bulb formation.
botanical-name botanical name Allium cepa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 10-16 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

Also known as green onions, scallions provide the onion flavor you love in less time than it takes to form a mature bulb onion. You can grow any type of onion as a ‘green onion,’ but I like to choose non-bulbing varieties like ‘Tokyo Long’ since plant breeders have selected them for their greens.

You can plant scallions in individual rows, but I like to plant the seeds in clumps of five to seven seeds. When it’s time to harvest, just pull up the clump and shake off the excess soil.

Since green onion roots grow only a few inches long, you can get away with planting them in shallow containers.

34. Swiss Chard ‘Celebration’

Celebration Swiss chards with glossy, wrinkled, deep green leaves contrast beautifully against brown soil. The chard features stems in lively hues of orange and yellow, creating a visually striking and colorful display in the garden.
‘Celebration’ Swiss chard brings colorful joy to winter with its vibrant stems.
botanical-name botanical name Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-20 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

In the darkness of winter, the rainbow colors of ‘Celebration’ Swiss chard delight. These plants produce leafy greens atop bright stems with yellow, pink, and orange hues.

Gardeners typically grow Swiss chard as mature plants and harvest the larger outer leaves. As long as you leave the inner leaves, they’ll continue growing and provide you with multiple harvests throughout the winter.

Another option is to plant the seeds closer together and harvest the plants as baby greens. This is a good option if you’re short on space or time.

35. Swiss Chard ‘Ruby Red’

Ruby Red Swiss chards with an intriguing blend of deep purple and green leaves. The stems, featuring tones of light green and deep red, complement the foliage, creating a visually captivating assortment of colors.
‘Ruby Red’ chard is ideal for various dishes, from soups to frittatas.
botanical-name botanical name Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-20 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 4-9

If you love the combination of red and green, ‘Ruby Red’ chard is the way to go. The deep red stems and bright green leaves work great in dishes ranging from lasagna to frittatas to soups.

Since mature ‘Ruby Red’ produces robust root systems, choose a container at least a foot deep and provide each plant with a square foot of space. Harvest the outer leaves and leave the smaller inner leaves for future harvests.

36. Spinach ‘Bloomsdale’

Clusters of Bloomsdale spinach leaves, crinkled in texture, capturing sunlight. Each leaf bears a pronounced, spade-like shape with rounded edges, inviting to touch and taste in vibrant salads or cooked dishes.
This offers deeply textured leaves perfect for cooking in pasta dishes.
botanical-name botanical name Spinacia oleracea
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-20 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Bloomsdale’ is an open-pollinated variety with deeply savoyed green leaves. I like to let the leaves grow large and then cook them down for use in lasagna or mixed pasta.

Spinach germinates and grows best at temperatures below 80°F, so keep the plants out of warmer areas of your home. You can even put them in cool garages or basements if the plants receive eight hours of daily light.

37. Spinach ‘Matador’

Black pots hold flourishing Matador spinach, with green leaves boasting smooth edges. The leaves exhibit a luscious, deep green hue, contrasting sharply against the dark pots. In the blurred background, lush green grasses enhance the lively garden scene.
When spaced two to three inches apart, ‘Matador’ spinach thrives in shallow containers.
botanical-name botanical name Spinacia oleracea
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 12-20 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

With smooth leaves, ‘Matador’ is a great variety for baby spinach. Choose a container about four to six inches deep and plant the seeds so they’re two to three inches apart. The little seedlings will grow into baby-sized leaves within a few weeks.

If you want to harvest your spinach more than once, carefully cut or pinch off the outer leaves of each plant. The remaining inner leaves will continue to grow and provide future harvests.

38. Tatsoi

In sizable black pots adorned with rocks, vibrant tatsoi greens thrive, glistening with dew. The succulent tatsoi leaves stand proudly, reaching skyward in the nurturing environment provided by the containers.
This vegetable offers tender greens and smaller leaves with longer, skinnier stems.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. narinosa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 6-10 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

If you’ve never heard of tatsoi, consider it a close cousin of bok choy. Both plants have tender greens and stems, but tatsoi has longer, skinnier stems and smaller leaves.

I’ve grown tatsoi for mature rosettes and baby greens, and both are delicious! Give the mature plants at least eight inches of space to expand and space seeds for baby greens about an inch apart.

Tatsoi can tolerate warm and cold temperatures but requires at least eight hours of bright light each day to shine.

39. Turnip ‘Market Express’

Lush ‘Market Express’ turnip leaves burst from the confines of a squared white styrofoam container, their green hues soaking up the sunlight. Each leaf stands tall, creating a lively and dynamic display of fresh, healthy produce.
‘Market Express’ turnips offer sweet, tender roots and versatile greens.
botanical-name botanical name Brassica rapa subsp. rapa
sun-requirements sun requirements Full Sun
height height 8-12 inches tall
hardiness-zones hardiness zones 3-9

‘Market Express’ is a white salad turnip with tender, sweet, white roots. They’re tender enough to eat raw as snacks and hold up to roasting and sautéeing. The greens taste excellent when cooked with oil, onions, and garlic.

These turnips taste best when the roots are small, about two inches wide. I recommend planting a row of the seeds and spacing them about an inch apart. As you harvest the quicker maturing roots, the smaller plants will have more room to expand.

Final Thoughts

You can grow just about any winter vegetable indoors as long as you have the space, patience, and light! Choose a few of your favorites from this list and get ready to enjoy fresh veggies all winter long.

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