31 Potato Varieties To Plant This Year

It’s just about time to get your seed potatoes chitted and ready for planting. Let’s discuss 31 potato varieties you may want to try this year with organic farmer Jenna Rich.

A wooden crate overflows with fresh potatoes, promising hearty meals. In the earth nearby, more potatoes nestle, awaiting their turn to be harvested. Greenery provides a backdrop, hinting at the fertile garden's abundance.

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Potatoes have been grown for hundreds of years for their starchy tubers and long storage capabilities. They’re fun and rewarding, fairly low-maintenance with proper pest control, and come in many different types and varieties to suit your needs. Early-season varieties are ready in about 90 days, mid-season in 100 days+, and late-season will take 110 days or more to be ready for harvest. 

Getting the timing of potato planting is crucial to their success. The warmer your climate, the earlier you can plant them. Preparing beds in the fall is best so you can plant them two to four weeks before your last spring frost.

Growers in zones 3 to 5 can generally plant from April first through the end of June. Those in zones 6 to 8 can plant mid-February through mid-April. Warm-climate gardeners in zones 9 to 10 can plant from mid-January through the end of February.

All types can be grown in partial shade but full sun will help them develop lots of foliage to feed the tubers below and produce more, larger potatoes. For a continuous supply of potatoes, grow a mix of early, second early, main, and late season varieties. Grab around a pound per five feet of growing space, and let’s explore 31 potato varieties to plant this year

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Russet

This is the potato type that probably comes to mind when you think of a potato. It’s relatively large, with dark brown skin and a thick, off-white interior. Russets are often used to bake, stuff, and mash and are called “baking potatoes”

‘Goldrush’ 

Goldrush potatoes rest atop brown soil, contrasting their vibrant hues. The sun's rays gently caress the golden skin of the potatoes, highlighting their earthy essence and promising flavors of warmth and abundance.
Grow ‘Goldrush’ for its consistent yields.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Goldrush’
HEIGHT 20 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 100
MATURITY SEASON Main season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

A classic russet potato, ‘Goldrush’ is a block tuber, light brown, and has great flavor. 

Growers love it for its consistency, reliability, and medium to high yields. They also store well and have high resistance to hollow heart, verticillium wilt, and scab

Space ‘Goldrush’ rows at 36 inches between and give plants 12 to 15 inches on either side. Two pounds of seed potatoes planted cut should get you 10-15 potatoes to plant. 

‘Canela’ 

Canela potatoes nestled together, their skins textured with earthy hues, resembling a patchwork of rustic charm. Its rough surface hints at the natural ruggedness of these tubers, evoking the allure of farm-fresh produce ready for culinary exploration.
This Russet variety offers diverse flavors and storage capabilities.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Canela’ PVP
HEIGHT 18 to 24 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 100 to 130
MATURITY SEASON Late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

A bit darker brown than ‘Goldrush’ and with a bright white interior flesh, this russet potato makes the perfect fries and baked potatoes, both of which look and taste great. 

‘Canela’ is prized for its incredible storage capability, high yields, and uniformity

Plant in loamy soil three to five inches deep and 12 to 15 inches apart. 

‘Burbank’

Burbank potatoes rest on a moist surface, showcasing their earthy allure. Each potato retains traces of soil and remnants of roots, embodying their journey from the fertile ground to the kitchen table.
These potatoes thrive in varying weather conditions with minimal watering during tuber bulking.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Russet Burbank’
HEIGHT 30 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 120+
MATURITY SEASON Late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

All hail the Idaho potato! ‘Burbank’ has mottled light and dark brown skin and white flesh. 

Fry it, bake it, boil it. It will never disappoint. The interior flesh is dry and flaky, making it versatile in the kitchen. ‘Burbank’ stores well and has been known to last all winter. 

When the potato plants are in the “tuber bulking” stage, they should receive about two inches of rain or irrigation per week, although ‘Burbank’ performs well in unexpected dry conditions. 

‘German Butterball’

A burlap sack spills German Butterball potatoes onto a rustic wooden table, showcasing their golden-brown skins. The table's grain complements the earthy hues, enhancing the organic appeal of the freshly harvested spuds.
A popular late-season potato variety called German Butterball is known for its buttery flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘German Butterball’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 100 to 130 days
MATURITY SEASON Late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

This popular heirloom produces medium golden potatoes with smooth skin and a beige interior. A smaller, rounder russet, ‘German Butterball’ is a late-season variety with excellent storability

Its buttery flavor and smooth texture make for the perfect all-purpose potato. Very high yields! 

Foliage is lush and large. Plants can spread up to two feet. 

‘Mountain Gem’

Mountain Gem potatoes, fresh from the earth, showcase soil clinging to their skin, hinting at their natural origins. In the blurred background, a multitude of these potatoes adds to the bounty of the harvest.
Mountain Gem potatoes are marketable and resilient against fusarium dry rot.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Mountain Gem’, ‘A03158-2TE’ before release
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 90
MATURITY SEASON Mid to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Oblong and dark brown exteriors with a stark off-white interior, ‘Mountain Gem’ is a medium tuber with high protein contents. This was developed by the USDA-ARS Aberdeen Idaho Potato Breeding Program

Yields are high during most of the year, allowing gardeners to tweak their planting time as needed. This is a great potato to bring to market that offers a wide range of culinary usage, especially for potato chips. Its outside appearance remains attractive throughout the growing, harvest, and storage process. 

This variety has moderate resistance to fusarium dry rot. After curing for two weeks, store tubers for up to three months at around 55°F (13°C) in a cool, dark, and dry area. 

‘Norkotah’

A cluster of Norkotah potatoes, their russet skins speckled with earthy hues, resting on a wooden table. Each tuber boasts a robust form, promising hearty meals and comforting dishes.
Consider planting Norkotah potatoes this year for their creamy texture.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Norkotah’
HEIGHT 20 to 25 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 95 to 110
MATURITY SEASON Mid to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

This determinate potato variety is always among the highest-rated market potatoes for their consistent oval shape, conformity, and attractive light brown skin. You can count on determinate potatoes, similar to tomatoes, to grow to about the same height and produce the same amount of fruits each time you grow them. No need to hill these, and they perform well in containers. 

‘Norkotah’ is a fairly mild-flavored potato that’s nice and creamy when cooked while remaining soft and moist. Remove the skins if you don’t love textured mashed potatoes. It’s great for all types of dishes and has incredible storage capabilities, up to nine months in ideal conditions.

Note this variety has a smaller-than-average root system and won’t perform well in drought conditions. 

Red

Red potatoes are rounder in shape with a thin, waxy red exterior. They hold their shape well when roasted, added to soups, or chopped up for potato salad, but they’re not great for mashing. 

‘Red Pontiac’

A close-up of Red Pontiac potatoes, arranged on a wooden surface, showcase their red skins under the warm glow of the sun. Each potato exudes a rustic charm, inviting the viewer to savor their earthy flavors and wholesome appeal.
Opt for Red Pontiac potatoes when planting in heavy soils.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Red Pontiac’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 100
MATURITY SEASON Main season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Red mashed potatoes? Yes, please! The thin skin and firm white interior of ‘Red Pontiac’ are perfect for mashing. They are even more decadent when harvested early and used as new potatoes. 

This is an easy choice if you have heavy soils as it performs well. Storability is good, so plan to enjoy these potatoes in the fall and early winter. Another determinate variety. 

Don’t forget to hill your potato plants as the stems grow vertically during the first few months of spring after planting seed potatoes. Why hill? For increased yields, sun coverage, weed suppression, and frost damage protection. 

‘Rooster’

A bunch of Rooster potatoes, their skins boasting a subtle shade of pale brown, hinting at earthy flavors. These spuds, with their delicate hue, promise a rich, creamy texture once cooked to perfection in a savory dish.
The Rooster potato offers versatility in cooking methods and flavors.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Rooster’
HEIGHT 24 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 120 to 140
MATURITY SEASON Main season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

‘Rooster’ is always delicious. They have a creamy yellow interior and light red exterior flesh that holds up when cooked. Keep the skins on for a nicely textured mashed potato. 

This reliable round red potato makes great baked chips, added to a roasted vegetable medley, or boiled into a quick and easy side dish. 

Are you limited in garden space? Try growing potatoes in grow bags or containers! Many growers have had great success with this method. 

‘Setanta’

A mound of Setanta potatoes, showcasing their plentiful harvest. Their vibrant red skins gleam under the soft light, promising a flavorful bite and culinary delight in every dish they grace.
Potato varieties like Setanta offer excellent resistance to blight and drought.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Setanta’
HEIGHT 24 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 125 to 140
MATURITY SEASON Main to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

A cross between ‘Brodick’ and ‘Rooster’, this variety was bred in Ireland to escape the effects of blight. While some say ‘Setanta’ doesn’t have the most incredible flavor, if you struggle with blight in your area, it’s an easy choice. 

‘Setanta’ has excellent tuber blight resistance, and stores well. It also has excellent drought, slug, and scab resistance and also stores well. 

A process called “chitting” will encourage your seed potatoes to begin sprouting before you place them in the ground. Place your potatoes in an egg carton or similar fashion container with the most eyes side facing upwards. Allow them to sit in the dark for four to six weeks before you plant them out. You should notice white sprouts forming. That said, if you have storage potatoes starting to “chit” on their own, save them as seed potatoes for the upcoming season! 

‘Désirée’

A cluster of vibrant red Désirée potatoes rests atop rich, dark soil, casting a striking contrast. In the backdrop, blurred foliage and additional potatoes hint at a bountiful harvest awaiting further exploration and discovery.
Plant Désirée in fertile soil for high yields with resistance to various diseases.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Désirée’
HEIGHT 28 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 90+
MATURITY SEASON Early main season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

This gorgeous light rose-tinted potato was bred in 1962 in The Netherlands. Its unique golden yellow internal flesh and six to eight-inch oblong shape set it apart from other reds. Its flavor is earthly yet slightly sweet.

Plant ‘Désirée’ in fertile soil for the best yields. Plants show good resistance to late blight, potato virus Y, and skin spot and moderate resistance to scab. 

When the foliage has died, the plant signals that potatoes are ready for harvest. Gently fork the area beneath the foliage to avoid damaging the potatoes and coax them out by pulling the whole plant out. This is easiest when the soil is on the drier side. Leave potatoes out to dry for a few days out of direct sunlight before storing. 

‘Sangre’

A woven basket holds vibrant red Sangre potatoes. Nestled on a wooden table, it presents a rustic charm. Some of the potatoes escape, adding a playful touch to the scene.
A medium-sized potato with shallow eyes, Sangre has white, firm flesh.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Sangre’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 70 to 90
MATURITY SEASON Early to midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 2 to 11

‘Sangre’ checks all the boxes: high yields, large tubers, excellent flavor, and good storability. Plus, she’s a real beaut and is resistant to many common diseases including early blight, potato virus X and Y, and leafroll net necrosis. 

A medium-sized, round to slightly oblong tuber with shallow eyes, ‘Sangre’ was released by Colorado State University in 1982. The inside flash is close to white and firm. Plant seeds up to three weeks before your last frost, about four to six inches deep in light, loamy soil. 

Don’t be alarmed by her slow sprouting; she’ll make up for it in dense, fast growth. The potatoes are produced fairly quickly, making it a good new potato option. Shallow roots make harvest a breeze. 

Yellow

Yellow potatoes are golden yellow inside and out. Their buttery texture and thin skins lend themselves well to baking, boiling, and mashing. The starch level is moderate and crisps up well when roasted. 

‘Yukon Gold’

A bunch of yellow Yukon Gold potatoes stacked together, their smooth skin gleaming under the light. Each potato boasts a vibrant golden hue, hinting at the earthy richness within.
Yukon Gold Yellow potatoes offer high yields and resistance to sprouting.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Yukon Gold’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 60 to 80
MATURITY SEASON Early season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Ah, the classic Yukon gold potato! These luscious buttery sweet potatoes are perfect for frying, mashing, or baking. They’re a nice pale golden yellow with light skins, up to a ⅓ pound each. 

‘Yukon Gold Yellow’ is sprout-resistant and high-yielding, so get your storage space ready. You’ll need it! Harvest some as new potatoes and enjoy the thin skins and sweet, small potatoes, leaving the rest to size up to full tubers for later. 

Ensure pH is between 4.8 and 5.4. Much higher, and plants may develop scab. 

‘Satina’

Freshly harvested Satina potatoes rest atop dark, rich soil, their earthy skins still speckled with dirt. Green leaves bask in the sunlight, framing the scene with a touch of natural radiance and growth.
Plant Satina potatoes in full sun two feet apart.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Satina’
HEIGHT 35 to 40 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 65 to 80
MATURITY SEASON Midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Slightly resembling a russet on the outside, this smooth, buttery yellow potato allows you to make gourmet meals at home. A consistent high producer that stores well, this one is an easy choice. 

Space at two feet and provide full sun for best performance. ‘Satina’ doesn’t require any hilling

This variety displays high resistance to scab and tuber late blight and is drought tolerant. 

‘Bintje’

A close-up reveals a cluster of Bintje potatoes, their skin textured with earthy brown hues and a fine layer of dust. Each potato rests snugly against the others, showcasing their natural, unblemished form.
The Bintje potato is an heirloom variety from The Netherlands.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Bintje’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 100 to 130
MATURITY SEASON Midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 11

‘Bintje’ is easy to grow, a moderate feeder, requiring little attention. Give her lots of sun and average water and she’ll produce lovely light yellow potatoes grown just about anywhere. 

This heirloom potato came to us from The Netherlands in 1904 and is still an extremely popular potato worldwide. The spacing needed between plants is just 9 to 12 inches. Storability is good, and flavor is great

Transplant a week or so before your last anticipated frost, but not in soggy soil. Pro tip: Planting whole potatoes rather than cut ones may reduce the chances of rot. 

‘Yellow Finn’ 

Yellow Finn potatoes rest on rich, dark soil, contrasting vividly against the earth. In the backdrop, lush green plants provide a vivid setting, hinting at the natural bounty of the harvest season.
Consider planting Yellow Finn potatoes this year for their sweet and buttery flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Yellow Finn’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 115
MATURITY SEASON Mid to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 4 to 8

‘Yellow Finn’ is a classic European gourmet potato. It is one of the best. If you guessed its origins are from Finland, you’re right! 

Its moist, sweet, and buttery flavor sets it a few notches above other yellow spuds. It’s slightly flat, and its interior flesh is a pretty pale yellow, creamy, and dense.  

It’s a pear or round shape versatile, fine for roasting, mashing, or boiling. It stores well, too! 

‘Colomba’ 

A cluster of Colomba potatoes rests atop nutrient-rich brown soil, their skins adorned with remnants of earth. In the background, green leaves provide a backdrop, hinting at the flourishing growth of the surrounding environment.
This versatile mid to late-season potato is known for its excellent flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Colomba’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 75 to 90
MATURITY SEASON Mid to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

An adorable round yellow potato, ‘Colomba’ is a mid to late-season potato with great flavor and storage capabilities with a medium dormancy

Bake, mash, or boil her. She’s not quite as dry as ‘Yukon Gold’ in comparison. 

Pro tip: Fresh manure may encourage potato scab. Opt instead for well-aged manure. 

White 

Thin skins and sweet flavor make for a quick mashed potato with no peeling necessary! White potatoes have a similar shape as yellow potatoes but are a bit smaller, rounder, and lighter in color. These are great in soups and stews and are popular among southern growers.

‘Irish Cobbler’ 

A group of Irish Cobbler potatoes, boasting gray, dusty skin, lies nestled together. Their earthy hues blend seamlessly, hinting at the rich flavors and hearty textures awaiting culinary exploration.
Consider planting Irish Cobbler potatoes for high yields and good storability.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Irish Cobbler’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80
MATURITY SEASON Early season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

While the origins of this aren’t certain, it’s thought to have been grown by Irish shoemakers who immigrated to the northeastern United States as far back as 1876. It’s a medium to large-sized cream-colored potato with off-white interior flesh. 

Enjoy ‘Irish Cobbler’ as a new potato or allow them to grow to full size. Yields are high, and storability is great

A downfall of this variety is its deep-set eyes and inconsistent shape and size of tubers. 

‘Kennebec’

A gentle glow bathes the Kennebec potatoes, highlighting their earthy hues and inviting freshness. Each potato, with its unique imperfections, promises culinary adventures and hearty dishes waiting to be crafted from this bountiful harvest.
The Kennebec potato is recommended for home gardening due to its adaptability and flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Kennebec’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 85 to 95
MATURITY SEASON Midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 10

A great all-purpose determinate heirloom potato from Maine, ‘Kennebec’ grows well even in tough conditions and remains high-yielding and reliable. It’s a medium-sized pale yellow potato that’s round or oblong and deliciously flavorful. 

Highly adaptable and delicious, these tubers are best grown at home as they don’t transport well. Bake, mash, or boil them for a quick, delicious meal or side dish. Their heavy flesh and resistance to late blight get them a high storability score. Plan on enjoying them all winter long. 

Each plant should yield two to six pounds of potatoes. 

‘Warba’

A close-up of Warba potatoes nestled in dark soil, their roots intertwining. The potatoes, tinged with lavender hues, bear traces of earth, their creamy-white skins marked by nature's artistry, a testament to their growth underground.
Plant Warba potatoes for high yields of round, flesh-colored tubers.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Warba’
HEIGHT 12 to 24 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 65 to 70
MATURITY SEASON Early
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Best for baking when full size, this large, high-yielding variety produces round, flesh-colored potatoes. ‘Warba’ is a great early potato with thin skin and tender flesh

When planting seed potatoes, ensure all cut edges are completely dry to prevent rot. Make a trench three to six inches deep using a furrow tool or the end of a rake or shovel held upside down. 

Ensure the soil is loose and moist before planting. Place the seed potatoes with the eyes facing up, space them according to the varieties you selected, and cover them with at least three inches of soil and tamp down.

‘Jennifer’

A cluster of Jennifer potatoes gleam brightly under the radiant sunlight, their yellow skins radiating warmth. They rest in a neat pile, basking in the luminous glow, evoking a sense of freshness and culinary potential.
Consider storability along with flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Jennifer’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 60 to 70
MATURITY SEASON Early to midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Love homemade French fries? Then ‘Jennifer’ is your gal. She’s an attractive oval-shaped, tan-colored potato with a creamy inside. Tubers are uniform in shape and size. 

This cultivar’s storage capabilities are moderate and its dormancy is medium. Select potatoes based on their suggested use as well as dormancy. This ensures they’ll store well for you with minimal sprouting and rot.

Pro tip: Keep potatoes in a warm place for a few days leading up to transplant. This will encourage them to “wake up” and may sprout a bit earlier. 

‘Ivory Crisp’

A mound of Ivory Crisp potatoes sits, their pale, creamy skins gleaming in the light. Each tuber boasts a smooth exterior, promising a delightful crunch and tender flesh within.
These North Dakota-bred potatoes are disease-resistant but highly susceptible to late blight.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Ivory Crisp’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 100
MATURITY SEASON Midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

‘Ivory Crisp’ came out of the North Dakota potato breeding program. It’s a round, white, medium-sized tuber with high yields. Its balance of starch to sugar makes it the perfect potato for making chips

This variety is at low risk for most diseases that defect tubers. However, it is highly susceptible to late blight. 

Don’t forget to hill up your indeterminate potatoes while they’re in the vegetative state. This helps maintain moisture and keeps tubers out of direct sunlight which may cause them to turn green. Green potatoes aren’t edible. 

Purple 

Purple potatoes are deep violet inside and out, adding a nice hint of color to your meals. They’re creamy and rich and taste great any way they’re prepared. The color and firm texture remain when they’re cooked, they’re small to medium with an earthy flavor. 

‘Caribe’

A cluster of vibrant purple Caribe potatoes sits gracefully atop a rich, earthy backdrop. Their striking hue hints at the flavorful richness they offer, promising a culinary adventure brimming with color and taste.
Consider planting ‘Caribe’ potatoes this year for early maturity and high yields.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Caribe’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 70
MATURITY SEASON Early season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Developed in Canada, whose name in Spanish means “Caribbean,” this attractive, waxy purple potato has crisp white interior flesh with an oblong shape and pretty purple flowers; a real show stopper! The flavor is excellent and great for frying, baking, and steaming. Potatoes will become very large if left in all season and given the chance. 

‘Caribe’ matures early and makes a great early potato. Yields are consistently heavy, and its resistance to tuber late blight is moderate. Plants show fairly high drought tolerance. 

Space ‘Caribe’ at 10 to 12 inches. 

‘Violet Queen’

A close-up of Violet Queen potatoes displaying rich, deep purple tones, hinting at their royal heritage. Adjacent, golden-yellow potatoes add a vibrant contrast, promising a diverse culinary palette in this close-up vegetable medley.
Choose Violet Queen potatoes for high antioxidants and nutty flavor.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Violet Queen’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 90 to 100
MATURITY SEASON Late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

It may not surprise you to learn that ‘Violet Queen’ is high in antioxidants when you see her from her deep blueish-purple skin and internal flesh. 

The flavor is nutty and rich, a dream to work with in the kitchen except when fried when it can taste greasy. 

‘Violet Queen’ can tolerate a light frost and shows some resistance to scab. Plant it with basil, beans, marigolds, or thyme

‘Russian Blue’ 

Purple Russian Blue potatoes, nestled together. Tiny remnants of soil cling to their textured skins, evidence of their natural origin and the earthy journey they've undergone from farm to table.
Space Russian Blue potatoes approximately two feet apart in rows during planting.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Russian Blue’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 60 to 80
MATURITY SEASON Early to midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 4+

Another gorgeous purple is ‘Russian Blue’ which is high in vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and, you guessed it, anthocyanins! Oblong in shape with vibrant purple flesh with an interesting white circle around the edge, this potato has a russet-like texture, great for mashing or baking

This variety is believed to be a heritage variety from Russia that requires a bit more legroom than some other potatoes. Space them out about two feet or more in rows. Plant when soil temperatures are at least 43°F (6°C). 

This variety shows some disease resistance and drought tolerance but doesn’t store great so enjoy them fresh or within a few months of curing. 

‘Adirondack Blue’

Several wooden baskets display Adirondack Blue potatoes. Bathed in sunlight, the potatoes glisten, casting shadows that accentuate their vibrant colors and rough textures, promising freshness and earthy flavors.
The high levels of antioxidants in ‘Adirondack Blue’ potatoes make them a healthier choice.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Adirondack Blue’ 
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 75 to 90
MATURITY SEASON Early to midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

‘Adirondack Blue’ is a gorgeous bright purple, waxy mini tuber developed by Cornell University. Its color remains even after cooking, and potatoes will grow six to eight inches. Roast, boil, or mash it. The flavor is great, and the plants are high-yielding. 

Potatoes continue to be recognized as an excellent source of food around the globe by the United Nations. They’re a good source of carbohydrates and vitamins, and they’re high in antioxidants. Plus, purple and blue foods naturally contain high levels of anthocyanin, which are believed to be anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial and help prevent cardiovascular diseases, among other health benefits. 

This variety shows good resistance to late blight and scab. While seed potatoes that display signs of scab aren’t guaranteed to produce plants that develop scab, it’s best to plant the healthiest seed potatoes possible to reduce the risk of issues during the season. 

Fingerling 

These resemble—you guessed it—fingers! They’re light brown, slender, and sometimes knobby. Fingerlings have thin skins and a smooth interior. They are the perfect potato to quarter and roast or fry into wedges

‘Magic Molly’ 

A bunch of Magic Molly potatoes sit atop a rustic wooden table, promising earthy delights. Among them, sliced potato rounds reveal a vibrant purple hue, tempting with their hidden colorful richness.
Plant Magic Molly potatoes for visually stunning roasted vegetable dishes.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Magic Molly’
HEIGHT 12 to 20 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 90+
MATURITY SEASON Late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

‘Magic Molly’ has somewhat of a cult following. Some growers pick them early because they just can’t wait any longer for their vibrant purple, but try waiting until full maturity for a real treat. Their external skin is a deep purple, almost black, and the inside flesh is a bright violet with a waxy texture. 

‘Molly’ plants display great vigor and while she doesn’t appear susceptible to many diseases, scab is not uncommon. 

These purple beauties will spice up any roasted vegetable medley. Visually that is, not in terms of flavor. Pair them with bright orange carrots and deep green broccolini to create a feast for the eyes and palate alike.

‘AmaRosa’

Fresh Amarosa potatoes sit atop a rustic wooden cutting board, their red skins catching the light. The rich hue of the potatoes contrasts beautifully with the natural tones of the board, creating an inviting culinary scene.
The AmaRosa potato variety boasts large fingerling-like tubers with a deep rose skin.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘AmaRosa’
HEIGHT 24 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80
MATURITY SEASON Mid-season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Among the largest of fingerlings, you may mistake these organic monsters for full-sized tubers. The exterior skin is a medium to deep rose, while the interior flesh is bright magenta, similar to a red beet. 

‘AmaRosa’ keeps her color after being cooked. She’s great grilled, roasted, or baked and some say she has gourmet flavor. 

Pro tip: Scrub the skins well and leave them on before cooking to take advantage of the high levels of various minerals and vitamin C. 

‘French Fingerling’

A close-up of French Fingerling potatoes, showcasing their red and pale brown skins, creating a vivid contrast. Bathed in soft, natural light, highlighting their unique textures and colors, inviting the viewer to savor their earthy essence.
Potato variety French Fingerling boasts a nutty flavor and versatility in cooking methods.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘French Fingerling’
HEIGHT 24 to 36 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 100
MATURITY SEASON Main season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

‘French Fingerling’ potatoes have light rose-colored thin skin that doesn’t require peeling before processing them into a delicious potato salad. The inside flesh is a pale yellow. The flavor is nutty and is great in all kinds of dishes; boiled, fried, mashed, and baked. Toss them in the air fryer for a quick French fry. 

They’re known to perform well even under less-than-ideal gardening conditions. Water regularly, but don’t allow the soil to become soggy. 

The plants are resistant to scab, a big win for potato growers. Allow up to two feet to spread out. 

‘Cecile’

A brown paper bag, slightly crumpled, sits atop a rustic wooden table, its edges curling gently. From its mouth spill red Cecile potatoes, each one a miniature marvel, promising earthy flavor and culinary adventure.
This potato is known for its stunning appearance, with red skin and creamy yellow flesh.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Cecile’
HEIGHT 18 to 30 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 90 to 110
MATURITY SEASON Early to midseason
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

This gourmet potato is about as stunning as a potato can be. It has lovely red skin with shallow eyes, a small, tubular shape, and a creamy yellow interior flesh. 

Space seed potatoes at 12 inches about four inches deep in March or April. Enjoy the harvest from September to October. 

Pest alert! The Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB) is a major potato pest and can destroy patches, small and large, very quickly. Hand-picking is a popular prevention method in organic gardening, but you can also seek out varieties less prone to damage, mulch, grow them in containers, use insect netting and row cover, and properly rotate your plots every four years. 

Petite/New/Creamer

Harvested before their full maturity, petite or new potatoes can be any variety. Harvested when they’re one to two inches, their skins are thinner and the interiors are sweet and tender. New potatoes are a popular early crop in the spring. 

‘Charlotte’

A close-up of a silver trowel holding Charlotte potatoes, small and yellow, contrasting against the rich, dark soil clinging to their skins. Their tender texture seems to promise savory meals and earthy flavors, freshly harvested and ready for culinary exploration.
A versatile potato variety, Charlotte is favored for its nutritional content.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Charlotte’
HEIGHT 8 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 80 to 90
MATURITY SEASON Mid to late season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

Organic farmer Eliot Coleman’s favorite and top-performing container potato variety, ‘Charlotte’ was bred in France for its flavor, texture, and hardiness. It’s a cross between Hansa and Danae potatoes, developed by Roger Salaun which remains a fan favorite among growers today. 

‘Charlotte’ is typically grown as a new potato and received an Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society in 2011 for its consistent ability to satisfy growers’ needs. 

This variety provides high levels of vitamin C and B vitamins. Potato skins are thin and pale with small brown spots. The interior is golden, waxy, and firm and the flavor is buttery, sweet, and nutty, just what you want for potato salad. The flowers are light purple. It’s a great all-purpose potato for baking, boiling, and steaming that keeps its shape when cooked. Storability is fairly low, especially when harvested young. 

‘Clancy’

Clustered red Clancy potatoes grow tightly intertwined, nourished by the earth. Their vibrant hue contrasts sharply with the rich brown soil beneath, creating a picturesque scene of agricultural abundance and natural beauty.
Grow Clancy potatoes from seed.
BOTANICAL NAME Solanum tuberosum ‘Clancy’
HEIGHT 24 to 40 inches
DAYS TO MATURITY 85 to 110
MATURITY SEASON Mid-season
HARDINESS ZONES USDA 3 to 9

This interesting red potato may be round or more of a fingerling shape and size. Considered a top “creamer” potato, its versatility is why we love it—bred by Peter van Hest and the first potato grown from seed to be awarded the AAS.

Start seeds indoors four to six weeks before your last anticipated spring frost at 60-70°F (16-21°C). Seeds should be sown about ¼ inch below the surface and may take two weeks to germinate. Transplant at 12 inches and cover as needed to protect from cold weather. 

This hybrid has disease resistance and lush foliage that can grow over three feet. The pink and purple flowers will indicate the tubers have begun to form, and you can stop hilling your plants at this time. 

Final Thoughts 

I’ve always thought of potatoes as a tricky crop to grow successfully after failing on my first attempt, but in my defense, it rained a heck of a lot that year, and I was a novice gardener at the time. With more experience and research, I’ve successfully and joyfully grown many potatoes since then. 

There’s just nothing quite like homegrown potatoes! With so many types and colors to choose from, I hope you add one of my favorites to this year’s garden plans

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