21 Purple Dahlia Varieties To Grow This Season

Thinking of planting some purple dahlias this season, but aren't sure which ones to pick? There are many purple dahlia varieties to choose from, so why not plant a bunch of them together? In this article, we take a look at 21 of our favorite purple dahlia varieties, with names and pictures of each!

Purple Dahlia in Garden

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Looking for a pop of color in your flower garden this season? Adding a few purple dahlias to your garden can add an alluring combination of differently hued purple blooms. Dahlias can range in appearance from delicate and pastel to rich and voluptuous. With over 40 different species and what seems like an infinite amount of varieties, Dahlias are one of the most popular garden flowers in the world.

Dahlias are flowering perennials that originate from Mexico, and love to be in the sun. From the light lavender color of ‘Mikayla Miranda’ to the deeper hues of ‘Imperial Wine,’ there is a different shade of purple dahlia for every gardener.

Whether you want a classic Dahlia with a fierce purple or a unique blossom with a surprising aesthetic, one of the purple Dahlia varieties on this list will be an idyllic addition to your flower garden. Let’s take a deeper look at our favorite dahlias with purple blooms!

‘Almand Joy’

'Almand Joy'
‘Almand Joy’ produces huge massive delicate purple flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Almand Joy’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3’-4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

The Almand Joy is a super easy purple Dahlia to grow in your flower garden. Yes, it’s Almand and not almond. These blossoms are massive, growing larger than most human heads.

They bring an elegant but colorful aesthetic to your flower garden and grow well surrounded by other plants as they don’t fight for root space.

The oval-shaped petals have a skinny tail at the end, giving them a semi-cactus quality, but they have a soft appearance. The petals mix pink, purple, and white, so they’re not as dark as other purple varieties.

‘Black Narcissus’

'Black Narcissus'
‘Black Narcissus’ blooms with dark red flowers with a purple tint.
Scientific Name: Dahlia “Black Narcissus”
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 4’-5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8-10

The Black Narcissus Dahlia is not black; it’s a super dark red that can look purple when grown under certain conditions.

People often liken it to a rich red wine or even blood-colored, which is a bit morbid. But the flowers take on a purple hue like a red sangria and can add a layer of dimness to make your garden a bit more mysterious and bewitching.

People typically opt for the brightest and most colorful flowers, but a dark Dahlia like this one will set your garden apart from everyone else’s.

‘Blue Bell’

'Blue Bell'
‘Blue Bell’ has purple flowers giving your garden a vibrant color palette.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Blue Bell’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial, Annual in zones 1-4
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial sun
  • Plant Zone: 1-12

Despite the name, these blossoms are clearly purple. Sometimes they have a slight pink or reddish tiny, so why they were named Blue Bells is a bit of a head-scratcher.

But these tough blossoms will put up with a lot while providing your garden with a brilliant pop of color.

The petals overlap one another impeccably, creating a fractal or geometric appearance that can be hypnotizing. And the blossoms grow bigger than your hand, so they can liven up even the barest flower garden.

‘Bluetiful’

'Bluetiful'
‘Bluetiful’ produces rich pink flowers that have a disheveled appearance.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Bluetiful
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial, Annual in zones 2-6
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 2’-3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-9

Another Dahlia with a blue name that is not blue is the ‘Bluetiful’! Once again, it’s strange it was named blue-tiful when most people agree this blossom is purple. If anything, one could argue it’s a rich pink dahlia!

As far as Dahlias go, this one is disheveled and messy-looking, giving it a natural and imperfect appearance some gardeners prefer. Sometimes their perfectly aligned petals can be rigid, but this variety has wavy, flowing petals that can hang and lean in different directions.

‘Boogie Nights’

'Boogie Nights'
‘Boogie Nights’ blooms with reddish-purple flowers and grows well in warmer climates.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Boogie Nights’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 3’-4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9-10

Boogie Nights is a gorgeous variety with a funky name! When you hear the name, it’s captivating, but the blossoms are even better.

They are reddish-purple with pointed oval petals that align perfectly in concentric circles. When you see their vibrance and presence, you’ll understand why they have this fun name.

While these Dahlias are desirable, they are not the easiest to care for. They do not handle low or medium temperatures well, so they grow best in warmer climates.

‘Chimacum Katie’

'Chimacum Katie'
‘Chimacum Katie’ has cone-shaped petals of pink-violet color.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Chimacum Katie’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Plant Size: 1’-2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8-12

The Chimacum Katie Dahlia is a bright blossom with small cone-shaped petals that create a fluffy and luscious appearance. This variety look like soft pom poms, and the petals always grow in a pinkish purple color, like a mulberry shade.

If you think your flower garden needs a fun color to liven it up, the ‘Chimacum Katie’ might be the most eye-catching on this list. But these blossoms need sun and heat, so the likelihood of them surviving a frost is zero to none.

‘Clearview Debby’

'Clearview Debby'
‘Clearview Debby’ is a gorgeous fluffy, delicately colored flower with thick purple edges.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Clearview Debby’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3’-3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

‘Clearview Debby’ looks similar to ‘Crazy Love’, but these are more homogenous in color. The purple edges are thicker than on Crazy Love, so this variety looks more purple than the Crazy Love.

These blossoms are fluffy and full, so they fit well in gardens that need more height. They can also fill bare spots because they have bushy bottoms and dark green leaves. These can grow light or dark purple but typically are soft purple with white accents.

‘Crazy Love’

'Crazy Love'
‘Crazy Love’ produces white flowers with subtle purple edging on the petals.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Crazy Love’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’-2.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 8-10

Crazy love Dahlias are an exquisite variety. Some gardeners classify these as white Dahlias and others as purple. In the end, everyone is correct. The center of the flower and most petals are pure white, but the petal edges fade into a lovely purple color.

It looks like the edges were painted purple, but it’s completely natural! So if you want a little purple in your flower garden but don’t want an intensely purple flower, ‘Crazy Love’ is the perfect balance of color and class.

‘Emperor’

'Emperor'
‘Emperor’ blooms in all shades of purple with large and long petals.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Emperor’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United Kingdom
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

Emperor Dahlia is special because it comes in all shades of purple, but it’s always purple. Sometimes it’s a dark plum color, but the petals can also be a mild magenta or pastel purple.

Even when you diligently research the bulbs you buy, it’s still a bit of a surprise what shade of purple they will be! And a single plant could grow blossoms in different shades.

The petals are also longer and larger, with spacing between them. So this is another variety with a messier look rather than the perfection of a classic Dahlia.

‘Imperial Wine’

'Imperial Wine'
‘Imperial Wine’ blooms with massive flowers of deep dark reddish-purple color.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Imperial Wine’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 1’-2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8-10

Unsurprisingly, these Dahlias are a red wine color, but their shape makes them interesting and sets them apart from others on this list.

The color is a dark reddish purple, like the Natal Dahlia, but the petals are elongated and curved, making the flowers look more delicate and messy.

Gardeners love to grow these because the bulbs often grow several blossoms that can clump together for a velvety and feathery appearance.

The blossoms are massive, which is one of the reasons for the royal name, and they will take up significant space in your garden. This may not be the best choice if you already have crowded plants.

‘Lavender Perfection’

'Lavender Perfection'
‘Lavender Perfection’ has magnificent pale purple flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Lavender Perfection’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Unknown
  • Plant Size: 3’-4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

‘Lavender Perfection’ is one of the most understated and pleasing purple Dahlias. The color is a faint magenta that creates a delicate appearance. These blossoms will bring a subtle pop of color that can make your garden look merry and supple.

The long, oval-shaped petals grow in concentric circles but not as tightly as other varieties, so they have a flowy and relaxed aesthetic.

‘Lavender Ruffles’

'Lavender Ruffles'
‘Lavender Ruffles’ produces light lavender flowers with long and wavy petals, adding a gentle charm to your garden.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Lavender Ruffles’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial, Annual in zones 3-7
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 1’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-11

As the name suggests, the petals on this flower are ruffly and free-flowing. Most Dahlias have tightly packed petals that fit beside one another perfectly, but these petals are longer and thinner, so they don’t all fall in line together.

They can be light lavender or delicate magenta. Many gardeners love them because the blossoms are like large pom poms with loose petals, so they have a casual and charming aura.

Compared with other varieties, they aren’t very tall, so they’re best planted in front of taller plants so they are not hidden from sight or the sun.

‘Lilac Time’

'Lilac Time'
‘Lilac Time’ produces delicate purplish-pink flowers, resistant to cold climates.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Lilac Time’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United Kingdom
  • Plant Size: 3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

‘Lilac Time’ has an adorable name, but they’re bold flowers. The petals are small ovals with a vibrant purpley pink that you can spot from far away. This is one of the more common purple varieties, so you should have no issues finding bulbs to start your own.

They originated in the UK and can put up with frost very well, making them ideal for chilly climates in the US. As long as their home is directly in the sun, you’ll achieve large, flowy blossoms with this stunning Dahlia. 

‘Mikayla Miranda’

'Mikayla Miranda'
‘Mikayla Miranda’ has large satin petals that fade from white to purple.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Mikayla Miranda’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

‘Mikayla Miranda’ is named after the botanist who discovered it. It’s one of the most enchanting Dahlias. They have large satiny petals that are white in the center and fade to a soft pink or purple.

These have a darling watercolor effect that makes them popular in wedding bouquets or seaside homes.

While this variety has the volume and layering of a typical Dahlia, the petals are much larger and flowy, so some people think these look like Water Lilies.

‘Mingus Randy’

'Mingus Randy'
‘Mingus Randy’ produces flowers with long and triangular petals in a delicate white-violet color.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Mingus Randy
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Plant Size: 2’-3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-12

The Mingus Randy Dahlia is more understated than many of the other purple Dahlia varieties on this list. Instead of a deep, dark purple, these are a light magenta or lavender color with a cream center. The petals are white in the middle and gently fade into purple for a beautiful watercolor effect.

Because this variety is a semi-cactus Dahlia, the petals are long and triangular, rather than the small cup-shaped varieties have. For an enchanting pastel-colored Dahia, you can plant these easy perennial flowers in your garden.

‘Mystery Day’

'Mystery Day'
‘Mystery Day’ blooms with luxurious flowers of purple, plum or wine red, contrasting with creamy white edges.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Mystery Day’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’-4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

For a striking Dahlia that will wow your friends and neighbors, The Mystery Day Dahlia is ideal. The name is, well, mysterious, and the flower’s appearance does not disappoint. The petals’ centers are a sumptuous shade of purple, akin to plum or red wine.

It’s a dark and vivid color contrasted with the petal’s edges, which are a creamy white. It’s safe to say this is one of the most unique varieties and a top contender on this list if you want to plant something easy but mesmerizing.

‘Natal’

'Natal Dahlia'
‘Natal’ has reddish-purple flowers, prefers to grow in full sun.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Natal’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8-11

The Natal Dahlia loves warm weather and sun, so they grow best in warm areas of the US. People often mistake these for Ball Dahlias, but this variety is different as it only comes in a rich reddish purple and no other colors.

If you want a bulbous blossom with captivating color, look no further than the Natal. The cone-shaped tubular petals are a dark color some people consider red, but the darker the petals turn, the more it looks like a luscious purple.

‘Purplicious’

Purplicious cultivar After Rain
‘Purplicious’ is one of the many different types of dahlias available from Swan Island.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Purplicious’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Swan Island (Oregon, US)
  • Plant Size: 3′-4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 1-12

Purplicious is a cultivar from the Swan Island dahlia farm located in the coastal town of Canby in Oregon. ‘Purplicious’ is one of the many different cultivars you can find from Swan Island’s offerings.

It has stunning purple petals, and they grow to about 3-4 feet in height. Their blooms are a dark purple, and they will bloom in summer, well into early fall.

‘Rocco’

'Rocco'
‘Rocco’ is a shade-loving variety that produces perfectly round pom-poms with fluffy red wine-colored petals.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Rocco’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 2’-3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

The Rocco Dahlia is the best choice if you want a unique flower to bring a whimsical element to your garden.

These blossoms look like perfectly circular pom poms with fluffy petals that create a voluptuous appearance. They have a rich red wine color and sometimes a light yellow center, which is a favorable contrast for many.

Unlike most varieties, these don’t want constant, full sun. So if you have a shady garden, these will still thrive. These blossoms are common in flower arrangements because of their striking appearance and charming purple color.

‘Striped Ambition’

'Striped Ambition'
‘Striped Ambition’ has bright purple flowers with purple stripes along the petals.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Striped Ambition’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

As the common name suggests, ‘Striped Ambition’ has stripes of purple along its pointy petals. This blossom looks like a bright purple sea urchin with velvety petals.

It sticks out even among other stunning plants, so it’s a perfect statement flower to have in your garden or place in your front yard. Many people love the deep purple Dahlias, but if you want something more bright and cheery, this variety is both noticeable and joyful.

Sometimes they start as a hot pink and then transform into a happy purple, so you can watch this magical change as they flower.

‘Thomas Edison’

'Thomas Edison'
‘Thomas Edison’ blooms with rich plum flowers, turning into maroon at the edges of the petals.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Thomas Edison’
  • ​​Plant Type: Perennial, Annual in zones 3-7
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3’- 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-11

‘Thomas Edison’ is one of the most popular purple varieties, but it’s unclear why the name references the famous American inventor. Nevertheless, the flower is dazzling. The petals are a rich plum color that fades on the edges to a deep maroon.

They grow tall, so making them stand out among a sea of flowers is easy. And they’re hardy flowers. They should technically grow as an annual in zones 3 through 7, but skilled gardeners can protect the bulbs from frost and keep them as perennials in less-than-ideal climates.

Final Thoughts

You can plant a Dahlia the color of your favorite wine or opt for one of the dainty purple Dahlias that make your garden whimsical and inviting. From lavender to plum and deeper purple, Dahlias come in a fabulous range of colors. Adding a few differently colored dahlias with purple blooms will help add visual interest to your garden, and give you a perennial flower you can keep for years to come.

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