How to Make Pothos Fuller: 5 Simple Tips

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Pothos, also known by the names devil’s ivy, silver vine, money plant, etc., is arguably the most popular houseplant of all time. With its attractive, heart-shaped leaves (not to be confused with a heartleaf philodendron), trailing vine-like appearance, and its ability to purify indoor air, pothos plants are an ideal choice for your home or office.

But…

Most of us want to know how to make pothos fuller – giving it that nice, bushy vine look. Here are 5 care tips that should help you out!

Method 1: Properly Prune Your Plant

How to make a pothos fuller
You can’t beat the way pothos comes from a nursery – tight, compact, and bushy! Source: floresyplantas.net

To get that bushy look, pothos plants require a pruning routine. If you don’t prune them, the stems will keep trailing and looking thinner and thinner. They’ll often grow into areas with even less light, leading to more sparse leaves and an overall non-sculpted look.

Tools Needed

The first and most effective method is to prune your pothos plant properly. You can encourage branching, bushiness, and give the plant the trimming it needs for optimal shape.

If you want a fuller-looking plant from the top, simply take your pruning shears and cut off the stems that are growing out and down so new growth starts to branch out from the top of the plant.

When pruning your pothos, cut just below a leaf node. This way you’re not leaving any bare stem without new growth at the end.

If it pains you to throw away these prunings, make sure to trim the stem a bit and use as cuttings for propgation!

Check out my YouTube video on pothos propgation if you’re curious.

Method 2: Fertilize Your Pothos

Pothos are not heavy feeders and don’t require fertilizer, but if you want to spur more growth you’ll need to give them a little boost. If you’ve been growing it in the same container for years, consider this method high priority.

You may use compost or liquid seaweed solution for fertilizing the soil at least once or twice a month. This will boost the foliage growth and make the plant look heavier and fuller.

For a solid fertilizer, sprinkle the recommended amount on top of the soil and lightly mix in using a hand trowel. Water the plant to activate the fertilizer.

If you’re using a liquid fertilizer, mix the necessary amount of fertilizer and water in a watering can and then pour the solution in the pot, as if you’re watering it. It helps to dilute to about half strength so as not to burn the plant.

If you have a water-growing Pothos plant, I don’t recommend adding fertilizer to it. It might attract algal growth and cause the plant to rot. Instead, replacing the water every week can do just fine.

It’s important to remember that too much fertilizer can damage the plant. If you suspect fertilizer build-up in the soil, you can remove the plant from the soil and then replant it with new soil. As an alternative, you can also drench the soil repeatedly with water and let it drain.

Method 3: Give it More Sun

Moving your pothos into an area with more sun will spur the growth of the plant considerably.
Moving your pothos into an area with more sun will spur the growth of the plant considerably. Source: Shihchuan

You might have noticed that pothos plants that are kept in well-lit places look denser and greener. That’s simply because they need a good amount of sunlight to thrive. Plants that are left in dark corners grow slowly, lose their variegation, and have a thin look. This is because the plant is stretching towards the light, so the distance between each new leaf node is extended, causing a thin look.

However, there’s a catch. You cannot expose them to direct sunlight. Pothos requires a careful balance of bright yet indirect sunlight.

Place your plants at well-lit locations around your house where they can enjoy indirect sunlight. The best option is a couple of feet away from a south, east, or west-facing window – don’t be afraid to place them close!

Method 4: Keep Them Well-Watered

How to water container plants 101 from my YouTube channel.

Curled up leaves and browning of leaf edges are classic signs of a dehydrated pothos plant. Plan a watering schedule for your plants if you want them to look fuller and stay healthy. Remove any damaged leaves from the plant and water it regularly to help it recover.

However, you have to be careful with your watering schedule for pothos. Too much water can also have adverse effects on their health.

Take a watering can to water the plants until some water flows through the drainage holes. But before you do your next watering session, make sure that the soil has completely dried out.

You can do a quick sticky test to confirm this. Just touch the soil and slightly press it with your fingers. If the soil sticks to your fingers, it means it’s still not dry. Wait until it’s no more wet and then water the plant again.

Method 5: Make Sure It’s The Right Temperature

Pothos like to live in temperatures within the range of 65-85°F (19-29°C). If the plants are exposed to temperature stress they begin looking limp and the leaves start to shrivel. Prolonged and direct sun exposure or intense heat may even lead to leaf burn, which certainly doesn’t help bushiness!


As you can see, pothos is a pretty simple plant. As long as you prune properly and then optimize the rest of its growing conditions so it’s in a place where it will absolutely thrive, you should start to see it bush up and look more full in no time.


The Green Thumbs Behind This Article:

Kevin Espiritu
Founder

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