9 Best Bow Saw Models To Make Cutting Easy

As we move towards the autumn, it’s time to start planning for future pruning and firewood-cutting needs. Having the best bow saw on hand when that time comes is a necessity. And finding the right one may seem a bit difficult.

Today, we’ll talk about everything related to the bow saw, including the blade types, how to change the blade, and even the history of the saw itself. You’ll be prepared to get out there and find yours by the time we’re done.

And of course, I’ll share my recommendations of the cream of the crop to help you choose!

Product Features
Bond BS21 21-Inch Bow SawBest TriangularBond BS21 21-Inch Bow SawBest Triangular
  • Tubular steel frame
  • Tension latch
  • Blade replacements available
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BAHCO 21-Inch Pointed Nose Bow SawTriangular with GripBAHCO 21-Inch Pointed Nose Bow SawTriangular with Grip
  • Good for tight spaces
  • Includes handle grip
  • Limited lifetime warranty
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Stansport Utility Camp Bow SawSturdy Camp SawStansport Utility Camp Bow SawSturdy Camp Saw
  • Hollow lightweight handle
  • Tension latch
  • Blade replacements available
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BAHCO 24-Inch Ergo Bow SawBest StandardBAHCO 24-Inch Ergo Bow SawBest Standard
  • Knuckle protector included
  • Variable tension bolt
  • Limited lifetime warranty
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Stanley Garden FATMAX Bow SawComfort GripStanley Garden FATMAX Bow SawComfort Grip
  • Comfort molded grip
  • Tension control knob
  • Guaranteed for life
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GreatNeck BB24 Bow SawGreat Basic SawGreatNeck BB24 Bow SawGreat Basic Saw
  • Chamfered drive end
  • Tension latch
  • Limited lifetime warranty
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Kenyon 41455 30Professional GradeKenyon 41455 30" Bow SawProfessional Grade
  • Tubular steel handle
  • Tension latch
  • Self-cleaning blade teeth
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Agawa Canyon BOREAL21 Tripper KitBest FoldingAgawa Canyon BOREAL21 Tripper KitBest Folding
  • Comes with sheath
  • Includes two blades
  • Collapses for transport
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GreatNeck 15550 Heavy Duty Bow Saw/HacksawBest HybridGreatNeck 15550 Heavy Duty Bow Saw/HacksawBest Hybrid
  • Bow saw/hacksaw hybrid
  • Tubular metal frame
  • Cuts wood and metal
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9 Best Bow Saw Reviews

1. Bond BS21 21-Inch Bow Saw

Type: Triangular Bow Saw

Bond BS21 Gardener's Choice 21-Inch Bow Saw
  • Heavy -duty tubular steel frame
  • Tempered double-cut steel blade
  • Blade removes for replacement blades

For a very basic and functional triangular bow saw, I have to recommend this Bond bow saw. With a tight-angled triangular nose, it can easily get into tight spaces between branches on trees or shrubs. The steel frame is sturdy, and the steel blade is sharp and works well.

This is a very bare-bones model, however. Many people who use a triangular bow saw find that having a hand guard helps them to more easily hold onto the tool, and this lacks that guard. The handhold is overtop of the tensioning latch, and that may not be comfortable for everyone.

If you want something that’s basic, simple, and no-nonsense, this is your tool. It does its job and the price is extremely competitive.

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2. BAHCO 21-Inch Pointed Nose Bow Saw

Type: Triangular Bow Saw with hand guard

Sale
BAHCO 332-21-51 21 Inch Pointed Nose Bow Saw
  • Small and handy bow saw for all around use
  • Pointed nose makes the saw ideal for use in tight...
  • Used for pruning and roofing work

This Bahco bow saw is designed to take on nearly any task you want to put it to. It’s designed for pruning or for roofing work.

A sturdy grip with a D-ring hand guard offers not only stability while using the saw, but safety so your hand doesn’t slide free. While the triangle’s tip is slightly wider than others in this category, that’s not a downfall, and it still works great in close quarters.

Of our choices today, I will easily say that this is the best saw for cutting tree branches. Swap out the dry wood blade for one meant for green wood, and it cuts through a wet branch with ease. Sturdily made, it’ll last for years and become one of the best bow saws in your toolbox.

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3. Stansport Utility Camp Bow Saw

Type: Triangular Bow Saw

Stansport Utility Bow Camp Saw, 30-Inch
  • Equipped with cross-cut blade
  • Designed to cut through logs up to 12" in diameter
  • A necessity for any campers gear

This Stansport bow saw is designed for quick use as a camp saw for prepping firewood, but it works just as well in the garden. It will easily go through logs as much as a foot in diameter. Small branches don’t stand a chance against this sturdy, lightweight option.

While it comes equipped with a cross-cut blade, you’re welcome to swap out the blades for any other type you need. 30″ in length, it’s a good size for medium to large tasks.

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4. BAHCO 24-Inch Ergo Bow Saw

Type: Standard Bow Saw with hand guard

Sale
Bahco 10-24-51 24-Inch Ergo Bow Saw for Dry Wood and Lumber
  • Country of Origin:Portugal
  • Package length:11.0"
  • Package width:11.0"

I had planned on highlighting a bow saw with a hand guard and one without. However, after looking at the ones without hand guards, they aren’t on par with others. All of the major makers have switched to a hand guard model on their standard bow saws.

After much consideration, I came right back to this particular Bahco bow saw. It was surprisingly close, on the whole, as other manufacturers have very similar styling. But the guard on Black + Decker’s bow saw was just a bit too meaty, and the one on Truper’s was just a bit thin.

Bahco made one that was just right, and while doing that they modified the tensioning latch. Instead of a latch, it’s a variable tension bolt that will give your blade a little wiggle if it’s necessary, or hold it taut when it’s not. That’s an added perk of this particular model not available on others.

24 inches in length, this will easily cut down your firewood with a dry wood blade, or can be used to remove branches or even cut down sapling trees if you know how. All things considered, I highly recommend this as one of the best bow saws you can get right now.

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5. Stanley Garden FATMAX Bow Saw

Type: Standard Bow Saw with hand guard

Stanley Garden BDS6510 Bow Saw
  • Large high-tension control knob easily locks in...
  • Durable hand guard keeps your hand safe
  • Comfort-molded grip reduces hand stress

One of the best things about the Stanley brand is that they love to guarantee their products for life. American-made, their products are durable and take a lot of abuse, and this bow saw is no different in that regard.

It tears through branches or brush with ease. The lightweight body makes it easy to use, and its comfort grip makes it comfortable to hold and reduces the chance of blistering. All told, it’s a sturdy and efficient offering from Stanley and well worth your consideration.

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6. GreatNeck BB24 Bow Saw

Type: Standard Bow Saw

GreatNeck Saw BB24 24" Bow Saw | Great Hardwood Saw, Cut Logs, Green Wood, Or Treated Wood with Ease...
  • EASY ATTACHMENT: This GreatNeck bow saw...
  • TOP QUALITY: This 24 inch bow saw is built...
  • PERFECT FOR OUTDOOR USE: Whether you need...

Tubular steel frame, check! Easy blade changes, check! With this model, GreatNeck has provided an easy-to-use, basic bow saw option that most of us can appreciate.

The chamfered drive end allows you to quickly slot your blade in place, and the tension latch pulls it taut quickly for fast blade change capability. Bright orange in color, it’s easy to see no matter where you leave it. And for a good basic saw, you can’t go wrong with this.

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7. Kenyon 41455 30″ Bow Saw

Type: Standard Bow Saw

Kenyon 41455 WP-7630 Bow Saw, 30" Steel Blade with Guard, Tubular Steel Handle
  • Kenyon 30" bow saw
  • Replaceable steel blade with guard
  • Tubular steel handle

This pro-grade bow saw from Kenyon is no frills, all action. You won’t find fancy tensioning knobs nor quick-change blades here, nor any knuckle protection.

What you do get is a tubular steel bow with a surprisingly effective blade attached to it. The teeth of the blade are self-cleaning, so you’ll be clearing out wood pulp with every push or pull. And while it doesn’t look like anything special, looks aren’t always what counts.

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8. Agawa Canyon BOREAL21 Tripper Kit

Type: Folding Bow Saw

Agawa Canyon - BOREAL21 Tripper Kit - (21inch folding bow saw with all-purpose blade, canvas sheath,...
  • Kit Includes:
  • BOREAL21 Folding Bow Saw - black annodized...
  • One Lightweight and durable emerald green canvas...

I’m not a huge fan of folding bow saws, but if you’re a backpacker or like to go out into the woods, it can be useful to have a collapsible tool in your backpack. This one comes packaged in a heavy-duty sheath which keeps it from opening when you don’t want it to.

Included in this kit are the folding saw with its anodized aluminum body, a standard dry wood peg blade, a heavy-duty peg and raker blade, and the sheath. That sheath also includes a shoulder strap if you don’t have pack room to spare, so you don’t have to leave it behind.

For folks who don’t need to cut firewood at the campsite, this is not the best option you could own. Opt for a fixed-frame model if you’ll be working out of your garage. But if you’re on the go and traveling, you’ll love the Tripper kit.

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9. GreatNeck 15550 Heavy Duty Bow Saw/Hacksaw

Type: Saw Hybrid

Sale
GreatNeck 15550 12 Inch Heavy Duty Combination Bow Saw and Hacksaw
  • Versatile Frame Can Be Used as a Standard Hacksaw...
  • Dipped Rubber Grip for Control and Reduced User...
  • Recommended for Cutting Wood (Bow Saw) and Metal...

Finally, we reach this small but mighty little saw. This GreatNeck hybrid model is both bow saw and hacksaw in one unit. It includes blades for cutting both wood and metal.

Only 12 inches in size, it works well for small projects, basic pruning, or cutting down PVC or metal pipe. The tension latch is rubber-dipped to provide extra stability in your hand. While it’s no-frills, it’s full of functionality and may be a great option for someone looking for just a small saw for light DIY work.

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History Of The Bow Saw

Best bow saw

Traditionally used in woodworking, a bow saw is occasionally referred to as a swede saw or buck saw. This style of saw has been in use for centuries, with examples from ancient China and the beginning of the Roman Empire being some of the oldest found.

Modern bow saws are often made out of tubular metal rather than the wooden frame of the older styles, but they function almost identically to their predecessors. A square, triangular, or curved frame keeps a metal blade stretched taut and allows you to create a clean and even cut.

The arborist’s bow saw should not be confused with a British bow saw, sometimes also called a frame saw or framing saw. While a modern bow saw has its origins in the frame saw used by carpenters, the blades themselves are significantly different.

A British bow saw has variable tension, allowing you to tighten or loosen the blade by simply tightening or loosening the tension wire on the upper part of the saw. While this can be useful for woodworkers who’re trying to get into tight spaces, it’s not necessary for wood cutting.

Bow saws like what we’re discussing today also shouldn’t be mixed up with the chainsaw bow saw. A predecessor to the modern chainsaw as we know it today, this early chainsaw with a bow shape was used mostly in the pulpwood industry to cut logs into 4′ segments.

However, those early chainsaw bow saws are incredibly dangerous to use, and have mostly been eliminated in the industry. Forestry rules have made them all but illegal to use now, and modern chainsaws have many more failsafes and safety measures.

Why Do I Need A Bow Saw?

Bow saw in use

If you have trees on your property, or even large, thick-trunked shrubs, you are going to find yourself in need of a bow saw sooner or later. While these tools require muscle power rather than an electric cord to do their work, a chainsaw is sometimes overkill.

For me, having a quality bow saw is essential. I can skip the wood axes or log splitters for smaller work and trim down smaller wood for my fireplace. If you have a chiminea, this will also be a fantastic purchase for you — after all, chimineas require wood of a specific size.

But they’re not limited to cutting firewood. Bow saws are also the easiest way to prune small to medium-sized branches on shrubs or trees. If you have woody growth at all, these are extremely useful tools in the shed. Even grapevines or other nubby growth can be easily cut to size.

Felling small diameter trees can even be done with a bow saw, although it takes a little bit of skill and a lot of safety preparations. These lightweight, maneuverable saws can spare you the maintenance agony of a chainsaw and the swinging motions of larger axes.

They’re also incredibly safe to use compared to a lot of the power tools on the market. While a chainsaw will make quick work of cutting your wood, it can also be quite dangerous. Hand-operated triangular bow saws can also get into areas a modern power saw can’t!

Essential Features

Bow saw blade guard

There are a few component parts that make up a bow saw. Let’s go over those now so you know what to look for!

Bow Saw Frame

As mentioned above, the earliest bow saws were wood, and typically were tensioned much like a framing saw. However, most commercial bow saws available now have a tubular metal frame which was developed in the 1920’s.

There are two basic shapes to a modern bow saw – a triangular bow, and a standard bow.

A standard bow shape is much like the shape of an archery bow or a C.  By comparison, a triangular bow saw slants down towards the forward end of the bow, and the arch is back by the grip area.

Triangular bow saws are very useful if you’re going to be removing woody growth on thick shrubbery or in tight joints on trees. The standard bow shape is better for cutting firewood. Both are effective saw shapes, they just have different uses.

Bow Saw Blades

There are two basic types of cutting edges on bow saw blades. One, the peg tooth, is intended for cutting through dry wood. Peg tooth blades are usually a single shape of tooth, meant to cut on both the forward and back stroke.

Peg and raker blades have two shapes of teeth on the blade. The standard pegs cut on both the forward and back stroke, but the raker helps pull wood shavings out of the cut. This makes it much easier to get through green, wet wood.

Some companies offer reversible blades. These have peg blades on one side and peg and raker blades on the other, and you simply remove the blade and flip it over to switch to a different type. This can be very handy if you’re going to a job site.

It’s important that with any of these blades, you get a blade guard that can snap over the edged surfaces of the blade. These can be quite sharp, and it’s safer when transporting or storing your blade to have the edge covered.

Tensioning Latch

While old-fashioned wooden models had a wire that maintained the blade’s tension, the modern metal versions use a screw on one end to secure the blade, and a tensioning latch on the other.

To replace most of the modern blades, you will loosen the tensioning latch, then unscrew the screw and remove the blade. Slide a new blade in to replace it, tighten the screw, hook the latch onto the blade, and lock it down. It’s extremely easy to do.

When the latch is engaged, it pulls the somewhat-flexible blade taut, keeping it securely in place and unlikely to bend during use.

Secure Grip

While older-style wooden bow saws typically used the frame as the grip, a modern metal one usually has some form of a grip on one side. Sometimes this is part of the tensioning system for the blade, as the handle helps lock the blade in place.

Usually, this style of grip provides a very sturdy surface to grasp onto while using the saw. It may also include a D-ring above the interior of the blade which keeps your hand from sliding off the grip surface.

Other variations include a pistol-grip style which wraps around the metal bow, providing a slightly-textured surface that helps you to keep it firmly in hand. And there are some which have virtually no grip at all, requiring you to hold the metal frame itself.

It’s not a bad idea to test out how you hold a bow saw and determine what’s best for you. I personally prefer the D-ring style, as it gives me a little extra leverage on the forward pushing stroke, but some feel the D-ring gets in the way of the cutting edge. The choice is up to you!


Whether you’re acting as your own arborist or simply heating the house, picking the best bow saw for your needs makes a difference. With luck, you’ve found what you need here!


The Green Thumbs Behind This Article:

Lorin Nielsen
Lifetime Gardener

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Last update on 2020-10-24 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API